Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/denebolasandbox/denebola_2009/wp-includes/ms-load.php on line 113

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/denebolasandbox/denebola_2009/wp-includes/ms-load.php:113) in /home/denebolasandbox/denebola_2009/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php on line 8
Denebola » Sports http://www.denebolaonline.net The Award-Winning, Official School Newspaper of Newton South High School, Newton, MA Fri, 17 Jun 2011 02:00:19 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.2 School spirit suddenly surfaces http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/south-alum-orgnaizes-japan-benefit-concerts/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/south-alum-orgnaizes-japan-benefit-concerts/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 07:55:45 +0000 Rutul Patel http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5742 On Wednesday, April 13, South pride was not just evident, but it was palpable. The students donned more than just the mundane jeans and t-shirts; they sported the Lions’ blue and orange.
It’s not that Denebola particularly likes the stereotypic perceptions of society about American high schools. It finds there is a lack of school spirit that shouldn’t exist.
Newton South has only one pep rally a year, and a shame the majority of the South students cannot unite under one cause for one hour.
Are mainstream athletics not engaging? Yet a high per centage of South students are involved in sports, at all levels, and the theater and arts productions are lively.
Is the auditorium too small to house a significant audience? but that was never its intent, and its purpose is well served in that there are so many events held in it, lecture hall and black box, that each student could acquire a ticket to at least one.
Are South students so overwhelmed by pressure-cooker Newton? Or is it that students don’t care anymore?
Football games are played to half-filled stands, and students don’t even realize that there is an enthusiastic Girls’ Hockey team.
Why does it take a remarkably concentrated display of talent – that conveniently gets students out of classes for the day – to arouse appreciation for Newton South’s overflowing well of genius on stage, at a desk, or on the court or playing fields?
This Wednesday, the school bubbled with unmatched flair and enthusiasm. The convergence of the kickoff of spring sports, the performance of Tertulia, and the quick approach of spring break were required to arouse the student body to open its eyes and realize the spectacular feats accomplished daily.
Smiles were pervasive, optimism apparent. Students were loud, active, involved – they enjoyed the day, whether it was because they spent time watching classmates sing, dance, and accomplish remarkable feats, or because they were enjoying all this with friends.
It has always been the mission of any high school newspaper, including Denebola, to offer a source in which all elements of student life are found.
With Advanced Placement tests, college admissions exams, and finals still looming large, the “window of opportunity” in which students can enjoy the high school experience within the walls of South wanes rapidly.

On Wednesday, April 13, South pride was not just evident, but it was palpable. The students donned more than just the mundane jeans and t-shirts; they sported the Lions’ blue and orange.It’s not that Denebola particularly likes the stereotypic perceptions of society about American high schools. It finds there is a lack of school spirit that shouldn’t exist.Newton South has only one pep rally a year, and a shame the majority of the South students cannot unite under one cause for one hour.Are mainstream athletics not engaging? Yet a high per centage of South students are involved in sports, at all levels, and the theater and arts productions are lively.Is the auditorium too small to house a significant audience? but that was never its intent, and its purpose is well served in that there are so many events held in it, lecture hall and black box, that each student could acquire a ticket to at least one.Are South students so overwhelmed by pressure-cooker Newton? Or is it that students don’t care anymore?Football games are played to half-filled stands, and students don’t even realize that there is an enthusiastic Girls’ Hockey team.Why does it take a remarkably concentrated display of talent – that conveniently gets students out of classes for the day – to arouse appreciation for Newton South’s overflowing well of genius on stage, at a desk, or on the court or playing fields?This Wednesday, the school bubbled with unmatched flair and enthusiasm. The convergence of the kickoff of spring sports, the performance of Tertulia, and the quick approach of spring break were required to arouse the student body to open its eyes and realize the spectacular feats accomplished daily.Smiles were pervasive, optimism apparent. Students were loud, active, involved – they enjoyed the day, whether it was because they spent time watching classmates sing, dance, and accomplish remarkable feats, or because they were enjoying all this with friends. It has always been the mission of any high school newspaper, including Denebola, to offer a source in which all elements of student life are found.With Advanced Placement tests, college admissions exams, and finals still looming large, the “window of opportunity” in which students can enjoy the high school experience within the walls of South wanes rapidly.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/south-alum-orgnaizes-japan-benefit-concerts/feed/ 0
Athletic fees skyrocket-as much as 95 percent increase http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/athletic-fees-skyrocket-as-much-as-95-percent-increase/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/athletic-fees-skyrocket-as-much-as-95-percent-increase/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 06:36:32 +0000 Noah Rivkin http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5743 As a result of the slumping American economy, schools across the country have been forced to make deep budget cuts and hike fees. South is no exception. South athletes will have to pay an increased fee in order to compete in next year’s sports seasons. High school athletics fees are slated to rise from $210 to $300 per sport with a $900 family cap. Some sports, like hockey, will also rise from $260 to $400 and football will see a 95 percent increase from $210 to $400.
“I would probably still play with such high fees, but the increase is a little upsetting. And next year there’ll be me, my brother, and my sister at South, and together we play a total of seven sports. So we’ll hit the cap pretty early. The increase won’t affect us as badly as they could’ve, but it’s still pretty ridiculous,” Hockey and Lacrosse player Brandon Kee said.
When Ted Dalicandro, the Head Football Coach, started coaching at South, the athletics fee was $125.
“I can understand why they might have to raise user fees to compensate for the budget; we still have a much lower user fee than some other schools in the Dual County League,” sophomore lineman Lucian Cascino said. “What does bother me, however, is that not all of the school’s sports had an equal increase in fees. That just isn’t fair.”
Football Captain and senior Brandon Caldwell also doesn’t agree with the new budget’s fees. “I think it’s ridiculous for kids to have to pay that much money to play a sport. I know many teams that already have far less kids than Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School or Acton-Boxborough Regional High School because of [increased fees]. It’s only going to put South teams at a disadvantage,” he said.

Dalicandro takes the fee hikes one step further. “I trust the people above me, but I’m upset. It’s fair to say that the demographic of the football players is different. This will affect those players whose families don’t have as much income. And I hope it doesn’t stop people from playing but [chances are it will],” he said. “If the fee increase was for, say a sport like tennis then it may not be as heavy of an effect because the demographics are different. It’s a fact.”

Dalicandro also has a budget solution he’d like to propose. To help cover the gap for athletics, Dalicandro suggests cutting middle school sports as opposed to high school ones. He sees the middle school athletics program as just an expensive “babysitting program.” The practices “aren’t legitimate, and there are many leagues outside of school that are [cheaper and train the kids better],” he said.

Attacking high school sports instead of middle school sports with fee-hikes seems ludicrous in Dalicandro’s eyes. “High school is much more competitive, with more riding on the line. There are kids looking for scholarships, and overall changing middle school programs would be much smarter,” he said. “If anything, I see most of my best kids come from leagues outside of school as opposed to the middle schools.”

Dalicandro remembers what South’s football program was when he started. There were barely 30 kids on the team and that wasn’t sufficient. Due to illness and injuries the team needed more players and with hard work Dalicandro, gained 20 more. He doesn’t want to see it go back to previous conditions, especially because of something like a budget.

Volleyball player Ashan Singh had a slightly different opinion on the matter. “To be honest, ultimately, I don’t think the raised sports fees will have a significant effect on the overwhelming majority of South’s athletes, however, it’s sort of ridiculous that the fee never really seems to stop growing. How much is it going to be?” he said.

Hockey and baseball player Dan Fitzpatrick agrees with Singh, “I’ll play the sports because I love them, but the [increases] are pretty outrageous,” Fitzpatrick said.

“I hope other people will play despite the fees, otherwise, the school might miss out on some serious athletic talent,” Kee said.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/athletic-fees-skyrocket-as-much-as-95-percent-increase/feed/ 0
Running shoes crucial for athletes http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/running-shoes-crucial-for-athletes/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/running-shoes-crucial-for-athletes/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:27:16 +0000 Josh Carney http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5811 An Olympic runner fitting running shoes sounds unrealistic. Yet Mike Roche is the owner of Boston Running Company in Newton Centre, and has been designing shoes for 25 years. He is a former Olympic runner as well.
Running is a crucial aspect of many sports, so a running shoe is the basis of performance when it comes to training. Shoes are crucial for student-athletes, it matters to invest in a durable pair of running shoes.
This fairly new local business is the “only store in the Boston area that does a video gate analysis” according to Roche.
This procedure is when a video camera captures the motion in which your feet travel, and when talking to a professional they are able to identify the weaknesses in your feet.
The runner is then able to get a feel as to the shoe that should be selecting according to one’s arch and other aspects of their foot mechanics.
Through this relatively simple procedure the employees at Boston Running Company are able to explain and then provide any customer with a comfortable shoe that fits his or her foot’s specific needs.
When selecting a running shoe it is critical to identify aspects of a runner’s mechanics that must be tended to.
“Some people don’t understand that most of the running company’s make a spectrum of shoes. They make shoes for people with high arches to people with flat feet. If they randomly select a shoe they have less than about a 20 percent chance of that shoe working for them,” Roche said.
It is important to buy a running shoe that works for you since there are many consequences to having poor running shoes.
For example, shin splints, knee pain, and other running related injuries. A personalized foot analysis is necessary in order to become less injury prone.
Some people may believe that he or she wears an everyday shoe that is no different from a shoe built specifically for running.
This belief is untrue do to the complexity of this specific category of shoes.
“The running shoe category is the only shoe category that provides very specific structure below the foot that helps either guide the foot more truly or to provide a lot of support.
“Running shoes are probably three times the complexity of the next category of shoes; what I mean by that is that they have a lot of components. It’s a very dynamic category,” Roche said.
When comparing shoe categories, there are many different aspects to consider in order to determine the complexity, for example, of just how many components are in the shoe.
“If you took apart a basketball or a tennis shoe there are literally three materials that make up the shoe. In some of the more complex running shoes there are at least ten or twelve molded pieces that all come together to form the shoe,” Roche said.
One might wonder; what does the durability of these complex running shoes do for the customer?
“If you’re fitted properly, you are getting a shoe that fits with your mechanics. Then another thing that the shoes give you is durability, the shoe is going to last longer than a $40 running shoe.
“Those shoes compress very quickly which means that you are not absorbing shock as quickly,” Roche said.
When determining which shoe to select in our current athletic environment everyone must take into account the different aspects of his or her feet’s mechanics in order to make the best choice.
The Boston Running Company in Newton Centre is there to help runners find the right choice for their feet by analyzing one’s specific running mechanics.
]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/running-shoes-crucial-for-athletes/feed/ 0
Shot put hopeful for season http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/shot-put-hopeful-for-season/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/shot-put-hopeful-for-season/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:26:30 +0000 Nathan Baskin http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5809
Seniors Brandon Caldwell and Alex Karys have been throwing shot put since last year and have enjoyed playing the sport.
The sport was introduced in the original Olympic games in Athens, Greece, and is a growing sport. The shot is 12 pounds but Karys does not discourage anyone from participating in the event, due to fear of injury.
Karys expects to attend Furman University in South Carolina, and wants to throw shot put during his college years.
The main objective of the sport is simply to “throw” a lead ball farther than the other competitors. Each athlete has to throw the ball from a circle called the pit; crossing the pit results in a foul, which causes the athlete to lose his or her turn for the round. The shot putters have three turns to throw the shot put and the best score is kept, while the two worst are ignored.
The average of Caldwell and Karys’s throws is approximately 40 feet. To train for shot put, Karys uses a very rigorous workout schedule.
He also plays football for South and participates in high jump. According to Karys, shot put involves a lot of muscle, but also involves a lot of footwork and thought. He believes footwork is one of the most important qualities of premier shot putters.
Caldwell and Karys are the oldest members of the team, but are also joined by six underclassmen consisting of both boys and girls.
Shot putters at South have not had much support at their events. Not enough fans show up, but Karys enjoys the sport regardless, hoping that in the future shot will have a bigger fanbase then it has now.
As the season gets under way, Karys has high expectations for the team and hopes they can make it to the State tournament.

By Nathan BaskinSeniors Brandon Caldwell and Alex Karys have been throwing shot put since last year and have enjoyed playing the sport. The sport was introduced in the original Olympic games in Athens, Greece, and is a growing sport. The shot is 12 pounds but Karys does not discourage anyone from participating in the event, due to fear of injury.Karys expects to attend Furman University in South Carolina, and wants to throw shot put during his college years.The main objective of the sport is simply to “throw” a lead ball farther than the other competitors. Each athlete has to throw the ball from a circle called the pit; crossing the pit results in a foul, which causes the athlete to lose his or her turn for the round. The shot putters have three turns to throw the shot put and the best score is kept, while the two worst are ignored.The average of Caldwell and Karys’s throws is approximately 40 feet. To train for shot put, Karys uses a very rigorous workout schedule.He also plays football for South and participates in high jump. According to Karys, shot put involves a lot of muscle, but also involves a lot of footwork and thought. He believes footwork is one of the most important qualities of premier shot putters.Caldwell and Karys are the oldest members of the team, but are also joined by six underclassmen consisting of both boys and girls. Shot putters at South have not had much support at their events. Not enough fans show up, but Karys enjoys the sport regardless, hoping that in the future shot will have a bigger fanbase then it has now.As the season gets under way, Karys has high expectations for the team and hopes they can make it to the State tournament.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/shot-put-hopeful-for-season/feed/ 0
Ageless Athletes: Matthew Anderson http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/ageless-athletes-matthew-anderson/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/ageless-athletes-matthew-anderson/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:24:15 +0000 Nathan Baskin http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5806
When he was 15 years old, he could dunk: on a full-size basketball hoop When he was at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst he played under legendary National Collegiate Athletic Association coach John Calipari.
And and when was a graduate student there he also helped coach an National Basketball Association NBA defensive player of the year, Marcus Camby.
Matthew Anderson, a math teacher at South, grew up in Brewster, New York. At Brewster High School, Anderson played basketball and soccer and ran track.
But his real gift was basketball.  When he was six years old, he first picked up the game of basketball and at 15 years old, he was 6 feet 8 inches.
He was a standout high school player and a top recruit during his high school career.  Anderson’s grades off the court made him an interest to such elite Ivy League schools as Harvard and Cornell universities.
His final decision was to come play for John Calipari, who was the Head Coach of the UMass Minutemen at the time.  Anderson said that for him, the hardest transition was “switching from being a Yankees fan to a Red Sox fan.”
Anderson had a extraordinary career in high school, averaging a double double per game, and even recording a rare basketball achievement and a quadruple double which consisted 12 points, 15 rebounds, ten assists and 12 blocks.
Anderson received his high school diploma in 1987 and came to UMass early for the season.  “Calipari was a great coach, and always stressed perfection,” Anderson said.
Anderson and the Minutemen had to run a drill called “perfection” during practice, which consisted of simple pick and rolls, and give-and -goes.
If it was not executed perfectly the players would need to start over.  Calipari was a young coach, but a strict coach too, who had no tolerance for people who were late.
“Calipari’s policy was if you were a minute late for practice, you had to come in the next morning at 4 AM and start running,” Anderson said.
At UMass, Anderson was not the only tall player; the team had many. Anderson realized he was not the best player, but was a key member of the bench and contributed on the boards and with blocks.
Anderson also did not mind not starting, being part of the team meant a lot. UMass got better every year, and with players like Anderson, reached the tournament level, losing in the Sweet 16 to Kentucky during the 1992 tournament.
“The hardest thing to manage was the school work you missed when you were on the road,” Anderson said.
To cope with this, he tried to take more classes over the summer before the basketball season began.
The team provided many tutors when they were away and according to Anderson, “Calipari was very serious when it came to academics.”
After realizing the NBA was not for him, Anderson left UMass after graduating and began working different jobs.
He was a salesman and a Transportation Security Authority airport security officer, which Anderson says “was fun,” but  what he finally realized after a time was that he wanted was to return to college studies.
He wanted to go to graduate school, and also asked Calipari if he had a job for him at UMass.
He did, and Anderson was given a tutoring job as a graduate student.  He would help the players with schoolwork on the road, and would mentor them on the court.
It was on this job that Anderson met Marcus Camby, who he described as a “7-foot monster that could run like a deer.”
Camby was the best player that Calipari had coached at UMass and made everyone feel his presence when he was on the court.
By the end of the 1996 season, everyone knew who Camby was; he was the train that led the Minutemen surge throughout the tournament.
“The most amazing thing about Camby was that he never got into trouble off the court, and he always got good grades.”
Anderson said he was not one of the kids you had to tell to do well in school; he did it himself without prompting. Anderson said his greatest achievement was getting the Minutemen to the NIT final Four.
He said it was the greatest achievement ever.  Anderson stopped playing basketball after a freak accident, when he fell off a roof while fixing it.
He stopped playing the sport because of the injury, but he has now been helping his two-year-old learn the craft of the game.
He is the coach of the Freshmen Basketball team and says that there are many people with talent on the team.
Anderson is a great teacher at South, and one of the elite athletes that South has on its staff.

By Nathan BaskinWhen he was 15 years old, he could dunk: on a full-size basketball hoop When he was at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst he played under legendary National Collegiate Athletic Association coach John Calipari. And and when was a graduate student there he also helped coach an National Basketball Association NBA defensive player of the year, Marcus Camby. Matthew Anderson, a math teacher at South, grew up in Brewster, New York. At Brewster High School, Anderson played basketball and soccer and ran track.  But his real gift was basketball.  When he was six years old, he first picked up the game of basketball and at 15 years old, he was 6 feet 8 inches.He was a standout high school player and a top recruit during his high school career.  Anderson’s grades off the court made him an interest to such elite Ivy League schools as Harvard and Cornell universities.  His final decision was to come play for John Calipari, who was the Head Coach of the UMass Minutemen at the time.  Anderson said that for him, the hardest transition was “switching from being a Yankees fan to a Red Sox fan.”  Anderson had a extraordinary career in high school, averaging a double double per game, and even recording a rare basketball achievement and a quadruple double which consisted 12 points, 15 rebounds, ten assists and 12 blocks.  Anderson received his high school diploma in 1987 and came to UMass early for the season.  “Calipari was a great coach, and always stressed perfection,” Anderson said.  Anderson and the Minutemen had to run a drill called “perfection” during practice, which consisted of simple pick and rolls, and give-and -goes. If it was not executed perfectly the players would need to start over.  Calipari was a young coach, but a strict coach too, who had no tolerance for people who were late.  “Calipari’s policy was if you were a minute late for practice, you had to come in the next morning at 4 AM and start running,” Anderson said.  At UMass, Anderson was not the only tall player; the team had many. Anderson realized he was not the best player, but was a key member of the bench and contributed on the boards and with blocks.  Anderson also did not mind not starting, being part of the team meant a lot. UMass got better every year, and with players like Anderson, reached the tournament level, losing in the Sweet 16 to Kentucky during the 1992 tournament. “The hardest thing to manage was the school work you missed when you were on the road,” Anderson said.  To cope with this, he tried to take more classes over the summer before the basketball season began.  The team provided many tutors when they were away and according to Anderson, “Calipari was very serious when it came to academics.”After realizing the NBA was not for him, Anderson left UMass after graduating and began working different jobs. He was a salesman and a Transportation Security Authority airport security officer, which Anderson says “was fun,” but  what he finally realized after a time was that he wanted was to return to college studies.  He wanted to go to graduate school, and also asked Calipari if he had a job for him at UMass.  He did, and Anderson was given a tutoring job as a graduate student.  He would help the players with schoolwork on the road, and would mentor them on the court.It was on this job that Anderson met Marcus Camby, who he described as a “7-foot monster that could run like a deer.”  Camby was the best player that Calipari had coached at UMass and made everyone feel his presence when he was on the court. By the end of the 1996 season, everyone knew who Camby was; he was the train that led the Minutemen surge throughout the tournament.  “The most amazing thing about Camby was that he never got into trouble off the court, and he always got good grades.” Anderson said he was not one of the kids you had to tell to do well in school; he did it himself without prompting. Anderson said his greatest achievement was getting the Minutemen to the NIT final Four.  He said it was the greatest achievement ever.  Anderson stopped playing basketball after a freak accident, when he fell off a roof while fixing it.  He stopped playing the sport because of the injury, but he has now been helping his two-year-old learn the craft of the game.  He is the coach of the Freshmen Basketball team and says that there are many people with talent on the team.  Anderson is a great teacher at South, and one of the elite athletes that South has on its staff.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/ageless-athletes-matthew-anderson/feed/ 0
Jumpers support themselves http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/jumpers-support-themselves/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/jumpers-support-themselves/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:22:51 +0000 Daniel Kats http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5804 Most successful teams have one thing in common: a strong fanbase. South’s track team, however, finds success on the field without much support from the bleachers.

Junior high jumper Nicole Kestenberg, who ranked third in the State Invitational tournament last season, is not affected by the team’s lack of South student support.

“The Track team is actually really supportive – it’s enough [for me],” Kestenberg said.

She is not disappointed that fans are not showing up, but does think it would be nice if the sport got more publicity. “Some sports, events, and people need more fans and support from students, but I personally don’t feel that [it is] necessary for high jump,” Kestenberg said. “I guess I wish more people knew what [high jumping] was.”

Kestenberg expects the team to do well this season because the team, which was successful last season, graduated two seniors yet still has six returning jumpers.

“A lot has changed since last year for the entire team – we have a new coach so it’s really hard to say [how good we’ll be],” she said. “We do pretty well.”

Experience in high jumping is crucial to a winning team. According to Kestenberg, the high jumpers practice longer than most of the Track and Field events, and they spend most of the time bonding and perfecting their technique.

One of the encouraging aspects of the team is the support the jumpers give to each other. “During indoor, all the girls of every team were really supportive to one another. We’d all clap after individual jumps even if they missed,” Kestenberg said. This support has helped the team prosper even though it does not have a lot of fans from the student body.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/jumpers-support-themselves/feed/ 0
Athletes’ injuries possibly preventable http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/athletes%e2%80%99-injuries-possibly-preventable/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/athletes%e2%80%99-injuries-possibly-preventable/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:19:43 +0000 Josh Carney http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5802
Injuries of all kinds have affected student athletes at South throughout this academic year.
Athletes who are becoming focused primarily on a single sport are becoming injury prone. These athletes stress the same muscles daily without exercising their other muscles, which results in those muscles being overworked.
Due to this, student-athletes suffer repetitive stress injuries with an above-average frequency.
“When kids focus soley on one thing, they become injury prone,” Athletic Director Scott Perrin said. When looking at specific sports and the repetitive injuries that result, it is difficult for one to tell which sport has the most students with repetitive injuries,.
However, according to Perrin, worst is Girls’ Soccer. “Girls’ Soccer has had issues with knee injuries over the years,” he said.
When athletes play sports that require extreme stress of a specific bone or muscle, the consequences can be severe. “Knee tears are perfect examples of this,” Perrin said.
With soccer stressing legs and knees, it is clear that repetitive stress is the reason as to why many athletes have, and currently are, struggling with the health of their knees.
The main cause of many of these injuries is that athletes are stressing their bodies by over-excising certain muscles, while leaving others weak and injury prone. “Yes it’s all about repetitive stress on a kid’s body. You wear out the same parts of your body over and over again without building up other parts,” Perrin said.
When being able to operate from a healthy position, it is easier to have a better performance throughout the competition or training session.
One idea that would decrease how injury prone certain areas of a student-athlete’s body is having the athlete play additional sports or train in order to exercise muscles that lack strength.
This would allow muscles that have not been excessively exercised the opportunity to build, while still maintaining the strength of muscles that are stressed through other sports.
“We promote and advocate for kids to play different sports, but if the student only plays one, we support that student as we would any other in our department,” Perrin said.
The idea of playing multiple sports that stress different muscles and bones throughout the body is positive for an athlete’s performance. Eventually the athlete’s endurance will build, thus increasing the athletic ability for the athlete’s primary sport.
The Athletic department encourages students to play several other sports for additional reasons, other then to prevent injuries.
When exploring different sports to play based on the athlete’s preference, he or she might want to be able to play a sport that increases their athleticism and skill in their primary sport. For example, a Basketball player that would like to increase his or her endurance and vertical jump may want to play Volleyball.
In order to prevent repetitive stress injuries an athlete should play other sports to exercise muscles that are not used as frequently as others. By exercising muscles that are not used as frequently, an athlete may make him or herself less injury prone.

By Joshua CarneyInjuries of all kinds have affected student athletes at South throughout this academic year.Athletes who are becoming focused primarily on a single sport are becoming injury prone. These athletes stress the same muscles daily without exercising their other muscles, which results in those muscles being overworked.Due to this, student-athletes suffer repetitive stress injuries with an above-average frequency.“When kids focus soley on one thing, they become injury prone,” Athletic Director Scott Perrin said. When looking at specific sports and the repetitive injuries that result, it is difficult for one to tell which sport has the most students with repetitive injuries,.However, according to Perrin, worst is Girls’ Soccer. “Girls’ Soccer has had issues with knee injuries over the years,” he said.When athletes play sports that require extreme stress of a specific bone or muscle, the consequences can be severe. “Knee tears are perfect examples of this,” Perrin said.With soccer stressing legs and knees, it is clear that repetitive stress is the reason as to why many athletes have, and currently are, struggling with the health of their knees.  The main cause of many of these injuries is that athletes are stressing their bodies by over-excising certain muscles, while leaving others weak and injury prone. “Yes it’s all about repetitive stress on a kid’s body. You wear out the same parts of your body over and over again without building up other parts,” Perrin said.When being able to operate from a healthy position, it is easier to have a better performance throughout the competition or training session.One idea that would decrease how injury prone certain areas of a student-athlete’s body is having the athlete play additional sports or train in order to exercise muscles that lack strength.This would allow muscles that have not been excessively exercised the opportunity to build, while still maintaining the strength of muscles that are stressed through other sports.“We promote and advocate for kids to play different sports, but if the student only plays one, we support that student as we would any other in our department,” Perrin said.The idea of playing multiple sports that stress different muscles and bones throughout the body is positive for an athlete’s performance. Eventually the athlete’s endurance will build, thus increasing the athletic ability for the athlete’s primary sport.The Athletic department encourages students to play several other sports for additional reasons, other then to prevent injuries.When exploring different sports to play based on the athlete’s preference, he or she might want to be able to play a sport that increases their athleticism and skill in their primary sport. For example, a Basketball player that would like to increase his or her endurance and vertical jump may want to play Volleyball.In order to prevent repetitive stress injuries an athlete should play other sports to exercise muscles that are not used as frequently as others. By exercising muscles that are not used as frequently, an athlete may make him or herself less injury prone.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/athletes%e2%80%99-injuries-possibly-preventable/feed/ 0
Paw-Aful and Springy for Spring http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/paw-aful-and-springy-for-spring/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/paw-aful-and-springy-for-spring/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:17:53 +0000 Zach Pawa http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5799 The spring season has arrived. For some, sports become another item to add to their already full plate of schoolwork, extracurricular, SAT tutoring, and some form of instrumental practice. For others, they become a sense of organization and relief.
I, for one, know that that when I am in season, my work ethic is entirely different. I go to Lacrosse or Soccer practice until around five, and then home to meditate.
When home, I know I do not have time to play NHL 11 for an hour or so, and then go shoot hoops with my neighbors.
I have to work efficiently with little procrastination or else the night will slowly turn to morning, and the chemistry homework sitting atop my desk will miraculously still be blank.
During winter, my offseason is an entirely different story.
I usually go to the gym to train, but when I get home it is still only four in the afternoon. What to do? Quandry.
I want to get my homework done, but I know I have nothing else to do, so what is originally a 30-minute assignment can turn into an hour-plus extravaganza.
Along with the new sense of urgency, the spring season also means spring weather.
Finally, after a winter that lasted an eternity, the snow has melted and the sun is out, allowing me to flaunt my guns for all to see.
The weather has turned and instead of sitting indoors watching Jersey Shore, we can spend some time outdoors.
With the beginning of the third, and final, sports season of the year, another thought is in the back of everyone’s mind (besides the Lacrosse team going to the State tournament this year).
Summer is just around the corner with only about two and one-half months left of school, we are in the final stretch.
So what makes the spring season so enjoyable? I have searched long and hard for an answer to this question, and after years of searching, I found the answer in a small hut located 23 miles southwest of Kyoto, Japan.
The spring season allows you to be outside in the warm weather and get that fresh air that we all crave. It’s trees budding, birds flying. The winter season consists mainly of indoor sports, and by the time you leave school, it is already dark.
The fall season has to compete with kids organizing their schedules to ensure they can achieve an above C average along with the idea that an entire school year is looming ahead.
So Spring is something entirely other,  let’s embrace it, practice hard, play hard, go home do homework (unless you are a senior, so chill, bro), and if you are lucky, you can have an extra hour of daylight to spare.
Enjoy spring while it lasts because soon enough it will be mid July and 90 degrees outside, and you will be looking back on the days when you could sit down without breaking a sweat.
So enjoy the last season of the school year, and come support the Boys’ Lacrosse team.

The spring season has arrived. For some, sports become another item to add to their already full plate of schoolwork, extracurricular, SAT tutoring, and some form of instrumental practice. For others, they become a sense of organization and relief.I, for one, know that that when I am in season, my work ethic is entirely different. I go to Lacrosse or Soccer practice until around five, and then home to meditate. When home, I know I do not have time to play NHL 11 for an hour or so, and then go shoot hoops with my neighbors.I have to work efficiently with little procrastination or else the night will slowly turn to morning, and the chemistry homework sitting atop my desk will miraculously still be blank.During winter, my offseason is an entirely different story.I usually go to the gym to train, but when I get home it is still only four in the afternoon. What to do? Quandry.I want to get my homework done, but I know I have nothing else to do, so what is originally a 30-minute assignment can turn into an hour-plus extravaganza.Along with the new sense of urgency, the spring season also means spring weather.Finally, after a winter that lasted an eternity, the snow has melted and the sun is out, allowing me to flaunt my guns for all to see.The weather has turned and instead of sitting indoors watching Jersey Shore, we can spend some time outdoors.With the beginning of the third, and final, sports season of the year, another thought is in the back of everyone’s mind (besides the Lacrosse team going to the State tournament this year). Summer is just around the corner with only about two and one-half months left of school, we are in the final stretch.So what makes the spring season so enjoyable? I have searched long and hard for an answer to this question, and after years of searching, I found the answer in a small hut located 23 miles southwest of Kyoto, Japan. The spring season allows you to be outside in the warm weather and get that fresh air that we all crave. It’s trees budding, birds flying. The winter season consists mainly of indoor sports, and by the time you leave school, it is already dark.The fall season has to compete with kids organizing their schedules to ensure they can achieve an above C average along with the idea that an entire school year is looming ahead.So Spring is something entirely other,  let’s embrace it, practice hard, play hard, go home do homework (unless you are a senior, so chill, bro), and if you are lucky, you can have an extra hour of daylight to spare.Enjoy spring while it lasts because soon enough it will be mid July and 90 degrees outside, and you will be looking back on the days when you could sit down without breaking a sweat.So enjoy the last season of the school year, and come support the Boys’ Lacrosse team.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/paw-aful-and-springy-for-spring/feed/ 0
Basketball milestones passed in never-before-seen way http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/03/23/basketball-milestones-passed-in-never-before-seen-way/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/03/23/basketball-milestones-passed-in-never-before-seen-way/#comments Wed, 23 Mar 2011 04:40:22 +0000 Mike Berman http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5599 The Newton South Girls’ Varsity Basketball team has witnessed history with an “H” as seniors Sophie Bikofsky and Kendall Burton each reached the 1,000 point career milestone in the same season, and also in the same game. In that one night, the number of South girls to have reached that milestone doubled, from two to four.

“It is a tremendous achievement as a high school athlete,” Athletic Director Scott Perrin said. “It’s just remarkable and speaks volumes to the commitment that those two and their other teammates put into the sport of basketball.”

Since they are the only teammates to have ever reached this highly recognized achievement, they are not the only ones to be excited. “Well the whole team was yelling and screaming for them,” junior Chloe Jackson-Unger said. “After it set in we realized how big of an accomplishment it was for both of them and you could just tell how proud the coach and parents were of them.”

They achieved it within a minute of each other, with both assists coming from senior Chloe Rothman. “Without Chloe, I don’t think either would have made it to their 1,000th point,” Head Coach Sam Doner said. “To be honest, I think Chloe really dictates the whole game and I don’t really see players like her being very unselfish.”

The event marked the first time in South history that two teammates have reached the 1,000 point mark in a season, let alone a game. “It’s very important to the South basketball program, as it’s finally being recognized and respected out there in this state,” Doner said.

These achievements are only a small part of the success the players, and the team as a whole, have had the last two years. Their accomplishment is much more than an important statistic; it is a symbol of Bikofsky’s and Burton’s work ethic. “It represents how hard they worked and how much our team had accomplished,” junior Ana Horowitz said.

Having so much success on the court does not only affect the team that currently surrounds them, but the teams that are yet to come. “It’s big because it motivates the youth program. They look up to these girls and realize that they want to be a part of it now,” Doner said.

The hard work that needs to be put into being successful as an individual and as a team have always been connected, but Bikofsky’s and Burton’s dedication has greatly impacted the team as a whole. This year, the hard work that these two have put has made not only themselves better, but also the team around them because it motivated the rest of the team.

Playing at a high level with consistency shows the impressive work ethic these two have possessed over the four seasons here at South.

“They tried to work harder then everybody else; they were the first to come to practice and the last girls to leave the court. They have certainly exceeded my expectations in a lot of different ways,” Doner said. “They were a lot more mentally tough then I thought they would be and proved me wrong on a lot of different occasions.”

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/03/23/basketball-milestones-passed-in-never-before-seen-way/feed/ 0
Lions win DCL, go far in tournament http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/03/23/lions-win-dcl-go-far-in-tournament/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/03/23/lions-win-dcl-go-far-in-tournament/#comments Wed, 23 Mar 2011 04:37:33 +0000 Erik Manditch http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5597 The Newton South Girls’ Varsity Basketball team had a season rarely seen at any level in any sport. They did not just compile a good record, the Lions also achieved something they never have before: they won the Dual County League (DCL). Their overall record was 21-2, including a 19-0 start to the regular season, and a 16-0 record in the DCL.

In the playoffs, the Lions defeated Brockton High School and Taunton High School in front of crowds that Head Coach Sam Doner believes have “a lot more respect [for the players] than I’ve ever seen.”

When South’s season ended on March 9, Doner was not as upset as many students assumed; he understood the value of this season to the South Basketball program. “It was a phenomenal season. The kids worked extremely hard. They achieved more than I ever thought they would,” he said.

During their stellar regular season, the Lions were dominant both offensively and defensively. They won their games by an average margin of 27.8 points and 12 of their 20 regular season games were won by 20 points or more.

In comparison, the 72-win Chicago Bulls team in 1995 only had an average winning margin of 15 points per game and only won 18 of their 72 games by 20 or more points, which is a 1:4 ratio compared to approximately a 2:3 ratio by the Lions.

It was only four years ago when the Varsity team went 2-17, and now it has transformed into a state powerhouse. Since Doner took over the team in 2007, the Lions went from a middle-of-the-pack squad to a team that can compete with the best in the region. This year’s senior class has seen the program rise from being at the bottom of the DCL to blowing through its DCL opponents and competing for a State title.

As magnificent as its season was, it is nearly impossible to go through an entire year without any adversity. As the players rolled into the closing games of the regular season, the Lions were thrown a curveball. Senior and starting center Julia Sloan-Cullen fractured her ankle after slipping on ice while taking a walk outside, and was forced to the sidelines for the remainder of the season.

This took away some of the season-long momentum the Lions had built up as they went into their game against Central Catholic High School, hoping to complete a perfect regular season. Unfortunately for South, it could not manage to pull through in overtime as Central Catholic defeated the Lions 73-70.

Nevertheless, the girls rebounded, pulling off back-to-back home playoff wins over Brockton and Taunton. Both games were very well attended and each included a raucous student section. The Girls’ team provided South with a team that was dominant and fun to root for, and they had a remarkable impact throughout the school.

Though the girls could not get past Mansfield and earn a trip to the TD Garden, this season will be remembered for the dominance South showed over the course of the season, the intense home playoff games that sparked huge school spirit, and certainly the 21 wins rather than the 2 losses.

“[This was] the most fun season of my life. The kids worked hard and were willing to go the extra mile and help other kids,” Doner said.

But what always will be remembered more than anything, are the camaraderie and the friendships built by this team that will last beyond the basketball season. “The chemistry and the atmosphere was outstanding between these kids,” Doner said.

After seeing three players get rewarded for their work with scholarships, a never-before-seen DCL title, and a strong run at the State championship, Doner is satisfied, if not ecstatic, about this past season. “I think this is a season we will never forget,” Doner said.


]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/03/23/lions-win-dcl-go-far-in-tournament/feed/ 0