Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/denebolasandbox/denebola_2009/wp-includes/ms-load.php on line 113

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/denebolasandbox/denebola_2009/wp-includes/ms-load.php:113) in /home/denebolasandbox/denebola_2009/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php on line 8
Denebola http://www.denebolaonline.net The Award-Winning, Official School Newspaper of Newton South High School, Newton, MA Fri, 17 Jun 2011 02:00:19 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.2 School spirit suddenly surfaces http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/south-alum-orgnaizes-japan-benefit-concerts/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/south-alum-orgnaizes-japan-benefit-concerts/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 07:55:45 +0000 Rutul Patel http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5742 On Wednesday, April 13, South pride was not just evident, but it was palpable. The students donned more than just the mundane jeans and t-shirts; they sported the Lions’ blue and orange.
It’s not that Denebola particularly likes the stereotypic perceptions of society about American high schools. It finds there is a lack of school spirit that shouldn’t exist.
Newton South has only one pep rally a year, and a shame the majority of the South students cannot unite under one cause for one hour.
Are mainstream athletics not engaging? Yet a high per centage of South students are involved in sports, at all levels, and the theater and arts productions are lively.
Is the auditorium too small to house a significant audience? but that was never its intent, and its purpose is well served in that there are so many events held in it, lecture hall and black box, that each student could acquire a ticket to at least one.
Are South students so overwhelmed by pressure-cooker Newton? Or is it that students don’t care anymore?
Football games are played to half-filled stands, and students don’t even realize that there is an enthusiastic Girls’ Hockey team.
Why does it take a remarkably concentrated display of talent – that conveniently gets students out of classes for the day – to arouse appreciation for Newton South’s overflowing well of genius on stage, at a desk, or on the court or playing fields?
This Wednesday, the school bubbled with unmatched flair and enthusiasm. The convergence of the kickoff of spring sports, the performance of Tertulia, and the quick approach of spring break were required to arouse the student body to open its eyes and realize the spectacular feats accomplished daily.
Smiles were pervasive, optimism apparent. Students were loud, active, involved – they enjoyed the day, whether it was because they spent time watching classmates sing, dance, and accomplish remarkable feats, or because they were enjoying all this with friends.
It has always been the mission of any high school newspaper, including Denebola, to offer a source in which all elements of student life are found.
With Advanced Placement tests, college admissions exams, and finals still looming large, the “window of opportunity” in which students can enjoy the high school experience within the walls of South wanes rapidly.

On Wednesday, April 13, South pride was not just evident, but it was palpable. The students donned more than just the mundane jeans and t-shirts; they sported the Lions’ blue and orange.It’s not that Denebola particularly likes the stereotypic perceptions of society about American high schools. It finds there is a lack of school spirit that shouldn’t exist.Newton South has only one pep rally a year, and a shame the majority of the South students cannot unite under one cause for one hour.Are mainstream athletics not engaging? Yet a high per centage of South students are involved in sports, at all levels, and the theater and arts productions are lively.Is the auditorium too small to house a significant audience? but that was never its intent, and its purpose is well served in that there are so many events held in it, lecture hall and black box, that each student could acquire a ticket to at least one.Are South students so overwhelmed by pressure-cooker Newton? Or is it that students don’t care anymore?Football games are played to half-filled stands, and students don’t even realize that there is an enthusiastic Girls’ Hockey team.Why does it take a remarkably concentrated display of talent – that conveniently gets students out of classes for the day – to arouse appreciation for Newton South’s overflowing well of genius on stage, at a desk, or on the court or playing fields?This Wednesday, the school bubbled with unmatched flair and enthusiasm. The convergence of the kickoff of spring sports, the performance of Tertulia, and the quick approach of spring break were required to arouse the student body to open its eyes and realize the spectacular feats accomplished daily.Smiles were pervasive, optimism apparent. Students were loud, active, involved – they enjoyed the day, whether it was because they spent time watching classmates sing, dance, and accomplish remarkable feats, or because they were enjoying all this with friends. It has always been the mission of any high school newspaper, including Denebola, to offer a source in which all elements of student life are found.With Advanced Placement tests, college admissions exams, and finals still looming large, the “window of opportunity” in which students can enjoy the high school experience within the walls of South wanes rapidly.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/south-alum-orgnaizes-japan-benefit-concerts/feed/ 0
South alum organizes Japan benefit concerts http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/school-spirit-suddenly-surfaces/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/school-spirit-suddenly-surfaces/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 07:50:08 +0000 Rutul Patel http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5774

Yoko Fukumura

On Friday, March 11, 2011, the great Eastern Japan Earthquake hit Japan. A tsunami that followed caused untold destruction and misery leaving homes and families torn apart. Even now the recovery effort is still in its infancy.
Along with the American Red Cross, charities and celebrities are raising money for the relief effort. On a much smaller scale, Newton South High School alum Taichi Fukumura (Class of 2010) has organized seven benefit concerts, the proceeds of which will go solely to helping the Japanese people.
An undergrad at Boston University studying violin, and a conductor of the Boston Accompanietta Orchestra, Taichi Fukumura saw no better way to help ease the suffering than to use his gift of music.
“When I was watching the videos on the news I decided that we, that everyone, need to do something to help,” Fukumura said. “Fortunately all my family was ok, but I do know some people whose relatives didn’t make it.”
Taichi, along with several other musicians and orchestra groups, used their collective background in classical music to help the people of Japan. He also enlisted the help of his younger sister and junior at South, Yoko Fukumura, and his friend and senior at South, Daniel Zhang.
Yoko Fukumura, a pianist since a young age, did a benefit concert a few years ago for an earthquake in China. “I am Japanese myself, so I feel more connected. And since my brother is organizing it, [that] further deepens my connection with this cause. I am not directly affected, but I hear stories from other people about their families and the conditions and I get scared,” Yoko said.
Zhang, a senior at South is the conductor of an orchestra group called the Boston Acompanietta and plays the violin “masterfully”.

Daniel Zhang

Taichi and Zhang created the orchestra in 2008 after the former head of the Music Department, Dr. Rossini, retired. Zhang is also in South’s official student orchestra called the Newton South Sinfonietta (NSS).
The Acompanietta is completely student run and directed, and does not play at the official school orchestra’s programs. Usually, the NSS plays a few times a day, despite having to perform in contests and shows. On the week of April 25, it will perform Saint-Saens’ Carnival of the Animals as well as the three concerto competition winners’ pieces.
Zhang has realized the difficulties of maintaining the NSS and conducting for the Acompanietta, but during the benefit concerts he will not be conducting, but rather performing while Taichi conducts.

“[The concerts] are a wonderful cause,” Zhang said. “I think it’s really brave that a lot of different groups are willing to perform for this cause.
Six days after the earthquake struck, Taichi began planning the concerts. Originally planning to have only a couple concerts with some solo performance, Taichi’s plans reached newer heights when he got in touch with other musicians.

Taichi Fukumura

“The organization was mostly my own. I got into contact with many administrative people in BU for help. Most of the people that I found were music major students studying to become professional performers,” Taichi said.
From then on his passion project picked up speed as he began turning his small time charity event into seven full-fledged benefit concerts. Out of the seven concerts, three are held in BU, three in the Eliot Church in Newton, and one at the New England Conservatory (NEC), a concert hall in Boston.
The concerts in Newton are on Saturday, April 16 at 8 PM. and Saturday, April 30 at 5 PM. and 8 PM.
Taichi has a policy of not performing in concerts that he organizes.
“[I usually don’t like to play] when I run the concerts. There is too much managing to do and performing would take a toll on me, both physically and in terms of the quality of performance. It wouldn’t keep me in the right mindset,” Taichi said.
He, however, chose to go against his principle of not performing and managing because this charity is close to his heart and will be conducting the last concert in Newton.
All three concerts are free of charge and funding for this charity is strictly on a donations basis.
“Any donations for Japan at the events will be greatly appreciated,” Taichi said.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/school-spirit-suddenly-surfaces/feed/ 0
Athletic fees skyrocket-as much as 95 percent increase http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/athletic-fees-skyrocket-as-much-as-95-percent-increase/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/athletic-fees-skyrocket-as-much-as-95-percent-increase/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 06:36:32 +0000 Noah Rivkin http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5743 As a result of the slumping American economy, schools across the country have been forced to make deep budget cuts and hike fees. South is no exception. South athletes will have to pay an increased fee in order to compete in next year’s sports seasons. High school athletics fees are slated to rise from $210 to $300 per sport with a $900 family cap. Some sports, like hockey, will also rise from $260 to $400 and football will see a 95 percent increase from $210 to $400.
“I would probably still play with such high fees, but the increase is a little upsetting. And next year there’ll be me, my brother, and my sister at South, and together we play a total of seven sports. So we’ll hit the cap pretty early. The increase won’t affect us as badly as they could’ve, but it’s still pretty ridiculous,” Hockey and Lacrosse player Brandon Kee said.
When Ted Dalicandro, the Head Football Coach, started coaching at South, the athletics fee was $125.
“I can understand why they might have to raise user fees to compensate for the budget; we still have a much lower user fee than some other schools in the Dual County League,” sophomore lineman Lucian Cascino said. “What does bother me, however, is that not all of the school’s sports had an equal increase in fees. That just isn’t fair.”
Football Captain and senior Brandon Caldwell also doesn’t agree with the new budget’s fees. “I think it’s ridiculous for kids to have to pay that much money to play a sport. I know many teams that already have far less kids than Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School or Acton-Boxborough Regional High School because of [increased fees]. It’s only going to put South teams at a disadvantage,” he said.

Dalicandro takes the fee hikes one step further. “I trust the people above me, but I’m upset. It’s fair to say that the demographic of the football players is different. This will affect those players whose families don’t have as much income. And I hope it doesn’t stop people from playing but [chances are it will],” he said. “If the fee increase was for, say a sport like tennis then it may not be as heavy of an effect because the demographics are different. It’s a fact.”

Dalicandro also has a budget solution he’d like to propose. To help cover the gap for athletics, Dalicandro suggests cutting middle school sports as opposed to high school ones. He sees the middle school athletics program as just an expensive “babysitting program.” The practices “aren’t legitimate, and there are many leagues outside of school that are [cheaper and train the kids better],” he said.

Attacking high school sports instead of middle school sports with fee-hikes seems ludicrous in Dalicandro’s eyes. “High school is much more competitive, with more riding on the line. There are kids looking for scholarships, and overall changing middle school programs would be much smarter,” he said. “If anything, I see most of my best kids come from leagues outside of school as opposed to the middle schools.”

Dalicandro remembers what South’s football program was when he started. There were barely 30 kids on the team and that wasn’t sufficient. Due to illness and injuries the team needed more players and with hard work Dalicandro, gained 20 more. He doesn’t want to see it go back to previous conditions, especially because of something like a budget.

Volleyball player Ashan Singh had a slightly different opinion on the matter. “To be honest, ultimately, I don’t think the raised sports fees will have a significant effect on the overwhelming majority of South’s athletes, however, it’s sort of ridiculous that the fee never really seems to stop growing. How much is it going to be?” he said.

Hockey and baseball player Dan Fitzpatrick agrees with Singh, “I’ll play the sports because I love them, but the [increases] are pretty outrageous,” Fitzpatrick said.

“I hope other people will play despite the fees, otherwise, the school might miss out on some serious athletic talent,” Kee said.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/athletic-fees-skyrocket-as-much-as-95-percent-increase/feed/ 0
Breaking News! Your essays may be plagiarized: Turnitin not foolproof http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/breaking-news-your-essays-may-be-plagiarized-turnitin-not-foolproof/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/breaking-news-your-essays-may-be-plagiarized-turnitin-not-foolproof/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:59:47 +0000 Jarrett Gorin http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5779 Plagiarism is the easiest way to fail. No ifs, ands, or buts.
There have been rumors going around—as there are each year—about so-and-so plagiarizing on his or her history paper and thus earning a zero.
Most students react in shock or disbelief. With our teachers’ numerous lectures, most onlookers are surprised that anyone would even think to try something so stupid.
Plagiarism can be unintentional, however. Scouring essays for copied work is tedious and annoying, and writers naturally assume that all their work is what it seems—entirely their own.
Accidents do happen. Certain phrases stick in our minds when we’re researching, and these turn up in our papers. We can rarely prevent this—it’s just the way our brains work.
And what if a coincidence happens? There are times when the phrasings of certain sentences can align with those of another source, even if a writer has never seen the source.
Our teachers try their best to prevent this sort of thing from happening, but using just their own intuition doesn’t seem to cut it. Now, Turnitin.com, a website that checks essays and papers against original sources for copied work, does it all for them.
Unfortunately, Turnitin has more than a few flaws.
First of all, the teachers’ settings for the site don’t include text sources. It only checks the internet and other submitted essays. Don’t many of the sources that we use for essays and such come from books? Sure, some books’ text is online, but most of the time this is not the case. This is clearly an enormous gap in the website’s ability to provide accurate assessments of work.
On top of that, Turnitin looks at everything in a paper. That means that there is not a single phrase that is omitted, even if it’s something simple, such as “The other day I went…”.
On my history paper, it said that my page numbers were plagiarized. Page numbers.
Turnitin is essentially useless. Of course, it catches some things; if you were to fob off an entire piece of work you would get caught.
However, Turnitin doesn’t catch the right things, but rather catches all the wrong things. Books are left out as sources, and citations, quotations, and even page numbers are counted. I don’t really see how anyone thought that this would help us.
Despite this, many teachers take Turnitin very seriously. My history teacher threatened to give a zero to anyone who didn’t submit their paper to the site by a certain time the night before it was due.
As for the actual issue of plagiarism, yes, it is a problem, and yes, it can be stopped.
Is Turnitin the answer to this problem? No, because it just doesn’t work.

Plagiarism is the easiest way to fail. No ifs, ands, or buts.There have been rumors going around—as there are each year—about so-and-so plagiarizing on his or her history paper and thus earning a zero. Most students react in shock or disbelief. With our teachers’ numerous lectures, most onlookers are surprised that anyone would even think to try something so stupid. Plagiarism can be unintentional, however. Scouring essays for copied work is tedious and annoying, and writers naturally assume that all their work is what it seems—entirely their own.Accidents do happen. Certain phrases stick in our minds when we’re researching, and these turn up in our papers. We can rarely prevent this—it’s just the way our brains work.And what if a coincidence happens? There are times when the phrasings of certain sentences can align with those of another source, even if a writer has never seen the source.Our teachers try their best to prevent this sort of thing from happening, but using just their own intuition doesn’t seem to cut it. Now, Turnitin.com, a website that checks essays and papers against original sources for copied work, does it all for them.Unfortunately, Turnitin has more than a few flaws.First of all, the teachers’ settings for the site don’t include text sources. It only checks the internet and other submitted essays. Don’t many of the sources that we use for essays and such come from books? Sure, some books’ text is online, but most of the time this is not the case. This is clearly an enormous gap in the website’s ability to provide accurate assessments of work.On top of that, Turnitin looks at everything in a paper. That means that there is not a single phrase that is omitted, even if it’s something simple, such as “The other day I went…”.On my history paper, it said that my page numbers were plagiarized. Page numbers. Turnitin is essentially useless. Of course, it catches some things; if you were to fob off an entire piece of work you would get caught. However, Turnitin doesn’t catch the right things, but rather catches all the wrong things. Books are left out as sources, and citations, quotations, and even page numbers are counted. I don’t really see how anyone thought that this would help us.Despite this, many teachers take Turnitin very seriously. My history teacher threatened to give a zero to anyone who didn’t submit their paper to the site by a certain time the night before it was due.As for the actual issue of plagiarism, yes, it is a problem, and yes, it can be stopped.Is Turnitin the answer to this problem? No, because it just doesn’t work.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/breaking-news-your-essays-may-be-plagiarized-turnitin-not-foolproof/feed/ 0
Opposing Viewpoints http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/opposing-viewpoints/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/opposing-viewpoints/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:56:24 +0000 Ilana Sivachenko http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5777 The new ice cream in the cafeteria is…

Pro

…delicious and necessary.

Usually I order sushi or go out during my free lunch block; occasionally I bring a sandwich from home, but last Wednesday was different…
As I walked toward the cafeteria, I saw a freshman holding a delicious, ice cream cone.
My mind was reeling from the shock. How could a 15 year-old be holding an ice cream cone in the hallway? Did his mother drop it off? Where did this mysterious and delectable snack come from?
I decided to put my top-notch investigative skills to work, but first I wanted to grab something for lunch. As I walked through the cafeteria door, I found myself surrounded by ice cream cones, and for once, I wasn’t hallucinating.
People were really holding ice cream cones!
I consider myself an epicurean, a go hard or go home fan of fine food so my journey to find a cold ice cream cone quickly turned into a contact sport.
I pushed my way through a horde of underclassmen to find the hub of the entire operation, a cooler filled to the brim with tasty frozen snacks.
After purchasing an ice cream cone, I was met with a number of disapproving stares.
Some people may say that ice cream is bad for your teeth, or that it is bad for your health. In fact, a food that contains milk as opposed to excess sugar, like Sour Patch Kids, is preferable any day of the week. In addition to this, there is also a positive psychological aspect: people love ice cream!
In fact, the average American eats 23.2 quarts of ice cream and other frozen dairy products each year. Scientists working with ice cream don’t try to remove the sugar or the calorie count, instead, they merely try to add nutritional value.
Ice cream is far from unhealthy, in fact a bowl of ice cream has less calories than your favorite soda, compare 200 calories per serving to ice cream’s mere 40.
To all the haters that nay-say sorbet, ice cream is healthier than many of the other products in our cafeteria.
The majority of ice cream on the market is made from natural sugar and milk, but it’s also important to remember that 60% of an ice cream cone is still water.
Every food, from meat to spinach, can have an undesired effect on your body.
Adding ice cream to the menu is certainly not the most damaging decision Newton South High School will ever make, and if it brightens the days of our students, I’d say it’s worth a few extra calories.
Complaining about ice cream when there are so many scholastic and social issues that need to be solved is both counterproductive and silly.
Ice cream cones are delicious, cold, refreshing, creamy and crunchy, and most importantly, sweet, and if there is one thing a Newton South student needs on a daily basis it is a healthy mixture of sugar and caffeine.

sually I order sushi or go out during my free lunch block; occasionally I bring a sandwich from home, but last Wednesday was different…As I walked toward the cafeteria, I saw a freshman holding a delicious, ice cream cone.My mind was reeling from the shock. How could a 15 year-old be holding an ice cream cone in the hallway? Did his mother drop it off? Where did this mysterious and delectable snack come from?I decided to put my top-notch investigative skills to work, but first I wanted to grab something for lunch. As I walked through the cafeteria door, I found myself surrounded by ice cream cones, and for once, I wasn’t hallucinating. People were really holding ice cream cones!I consider myself an epicurean, a go hard or go home fan of fine food so my journey to find a cold ice cream cone quickly turned into a contact sport. I pushed my way through a horde of underclassmen to find the hub of the entire operation, a cooler filled to the brim with tasty frozen snacks.After purchasing an ice cream cone, I was met with a number of disapproving stares. Some people may say that ice cream is bad for your teeth, or that it is bad for your health. In fact, a food that contains milk as opposed to excess sugar, like Sour Patch Kids, is preferable any day of the week. In addition to this, there is also a positive psychological aspect: people love ice cream! In fact, the average American eats 23.2 quarts of ice cream and other frozen dairy products each year. Scientists working with ice cream don’t try to remove the sugar or the calorie count, instead, they merely try to add nutritional value.Ice cream is far from unhealthy, in fact a bowl of ice cream has less calories than your favorite soda, compare 200 calories per serving to ice cream’s mere 40. To all the haters that nay-say sorbet, ice cream is healthier than many of the other products in our cafeteria. The majority of ice cream on the market is made from natural sugar and milk, but it’s also important to remember that 60% of an ice cream cone is still water.Every food, from meat to spinach, can have an undesired effect on your body. Adding ice cream to the menu is certainly not the most damaging decision Newton South High School will ever make, and if it brightens the days of our students, I’d say it’s worth a few extra calories.Complaining about ice cream when there are so many scholastic and social issues that need to be solved is both counterproductive and silly. Ice cream cones are delicious, cold, refreshing, creamy and crunchy, and most importantly, sweet, and if there is one thing a Newton South student needs on a daily basis it is a healthy mixture of sugar and caffeine.\

Con

…unhealthy and excessive.

I scream. You scream. We all scream for…

Ice cream. Duh. Reading that pro over there, you probably have your wallet out ready to buy some delicious Choc-Tacos or frozen Twix bars.

But wait! Something is amiss in this picture. Imagine yourself walking into the cafeteria. All you see are posters asking you if you got milk, (we’re not cows; we don’t carry milk on us) and telling you to live healthy. So why would a cafeteria that is so fond of promoting healthy eating sell ice cream?

Maybe it’s because they realized that most of the good food is gone by the time the majority of the students go to get their lunch.

Or maybe out of the goodness of their hearts they wanted to give us some delicious goodies to eat for dessert after we have our lunch. (A pretty pricy desert might I add. Someone should mention that $2.00 for a Klondike Bar is pushing it.  But then again some people may do that for a Klondike Bar.) Or it could be that the cafeteria wants to make more money.

You have to know your demographic. If you were in a retirement home, prune juice would be the way to go. If you were selling stuff in New Jersey, then you’d need a truck filled with hair gel and spray tan. As the kids in the entrepreneurship class would say, its basic business.

Don’t get me wrong, I have no problem with making money—capitalism all the way, otherwise the commies win. But the problem with selling ice cream in school is that you’re selling ice cream in school. What happened to healthy living?

Ice cream gets 48% of its calories from fat. And even the low fat alternative has 25% calories from fat. Giving kids that have a wallet filled with cash a virtually endless supply of ice cream is like giving Charlie Sheen the keys to Colombia’s cocaine factories.

As many of you know Charlie appreciates it, but it’s just not good for him.

There’s a reason that America is leading the world in childhood obesity. We refuse to moderate our needs.

If you eat one bar of ice cream every week, then you’d be all right. You would relish the treat while you have it, and you’d eventually work it off.

But if you had a virtually endless supply of ice cream, then guess who would gain 40 pounds and start taking the elevator instead of the stairs?

All I’m saying is that the cafeteria is hypocritical for have a slushie machine and a giant tub filled with ice cream surrounded by health posters.

If you wanted to keep kids healthy then ice cream wasn’t the best way to go. Also, the greasy food might not be the most clever way to promote good health, either. But that’s a rant for another time.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/opposing-viewpoints/feed/ 0
Elementary school music update http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/elementary-school-music-update/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/elementary-school-music-update/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:48:44 +0000 Daniel Barabasi http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5769 For the Music Department, recent cuts have hit hard, especially on the elementary school level. Fourth grade chorus and third grade recorder programs are being eliminated.
Along with cuts there are increases in fees like $200 for elementary instrumental music and a new $200 fee for All-City Band and Chorus groups.
South’s music department is mainly dependent on enrollment, so many smaller groups such, as music technology, are first to be cut or are forced to run less blocks. Due to the cuts in elementary school music programs, however, South spots troubles in the future. “What we are going to see is a reduction in the number and quality of musicians in the future,” Fine and Performing Arts Departments Head Jeff Knoedler said.
“When cuts start at the elementary school level it magnifies the effect that it has on the high school music program,” Music teacher Jason Squinobal said. When you cut the students’ first experience, like the recorder class, students start to learn to play later and they start to learn to play in a group together.”
The cuts in music will also bleed into the enrollment of classes like music theory, “Students will not be as interested in learning music theory as they won’t have the experience of what it is like to talk about reading music, playing scales, or learning theory at that third grade level,” Squinobal said.
Often due to a smaller priority assigned to the arts in comparison to other departments, the fine and performing arts have a tradition of being the first to feel the effect of negative changes in the school budget.
“It seems like arts in general is deemed less important than what people call the big five academic departments, English, History, Science, Math and World Language. When you place a higher priority on the big five, the arts become more expendable and are cut first,” Squinobal said.
Lisa Linde worries for future students. “I think all of Newton’s performing groups, which includes about twenty percent of our school, and around 50% of middle school students, will feel the heat in the next ten to fifteen years,” she said.

For the Music Department, recent cuts have hit hard, especially on the elementary school level. Fourth grade chorus and third grade recorder programs are being eliminated. Along with cuts there are increases in fees like $200 for elementary instrumental music and a new $200 fee for All-City Band and Chorus groups.South’s music department is mainly dependent on enrollment, so many smaller groups such, as music technology, are first to be cut or are forced to run less blocks. Due to the cuts in elementary school music programs, however, South spots troubles in the future. “What we are going to see is a reduction in the number and quality of musicians in the future,” Fine and Performing Arts Departments Head Jeff Knoedler said.“When cuts start at the elementary school level it magnifies the effect that it has on the high school music program,” Music teacher Jason Squinobal said. When you cut the students’ first experience, like the recorder class, students start to learn to play later and they start to learn to play in a group together.”The cuts in music will also bleed into the enrollment of classes like music theory, “Students will not be as interested in learning music theory as they won’t have the experience of what it is like to talk about reading music, playing scales, or learning theory at that third grade level,” Squinobal said.Often due to a smaller priority assigned to the arts in comparison to other departments, the fine and performing arts have a tradition of being the first to feel the effect of negative changes in the school budget. “It seems like arts in general is deemed less important than what people call the big five academic departments, English, History, Science, Math and World Language. When you place a higher priority on the big five, the arts become more expendable and are cut first,” Squinobal said.Lisa Linde worries for future students. “I think all of Newton’s performing groups, which includes about twenty percent of our school, and around 50% of middle school students, will feel the heat in the next ten to fifteen years,” she said.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/elementary-school-music-update/feed/ 0
The King of Limbs, but nobody’s dancing http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/the-king-of-limbs-but-nobody%e2%80%99s-dancing/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/the-king-of-limbs-but-nobody%e2%80%99s-dancing/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:41:18 +0000 Hattie Gawande http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5827
Radiohead is the band that every teenage alternative and/or indie rock fan theoretically adores.
Specializing in electronic, guitar-driven songs, raw, wailing vocals and abstract lyrics, they are the definition of alternative.
Unfortunately, what nobody really wants to admit is that no one can take them in anything but small doses.
After a certain point, the lead singer, Thom Yorke, who may be considered a genius lyricist, is just profoundly creepy.
Take “Climbing up the Walls”, a song off of their platinum selling record Ok Computer, in which Yorke howls “Fifteen blows to the back of your head/ Fifteen blows to your mind/ So lock up the kids safe tonight.”
And this was before his bout of depression.
Furthermore, after about twenty minutes, Yorke’s excessively wailing goes from expressive and haunting to so much inarticulate wailing.
By the fourth or fifth song, all the tortured moaning sounds the same.
Radiohead is also one of those bands that prefers experimentation over melody.
Most songs do have some semblance of a tune, but it consists of Yorke’s howling rather than distinct chord progressions.
It’s certainly not the sort of thing that you can sing along to. However, Radiohead has surprised us before. From time to time they put out an record that keeps being interesting.
Their incredible second album, The Bends, a revolutionary piece of music (it’s considered to have opened the door for such contemporary English bands and musicians as Coldplay, Keane, and James Blunt), was one such record.
Their wonderful seventh album, In Rainbows, released in 2007, was another. Unfortunately, their latest, The Kin of Limbs, is not.
The eight songs on the 37-minute album are mostly typical Radiohead fare–the usual pulsing keyboards weave in and out of repetitive guitars and bass, all underpinned by delicate yet hyperactive drums.
Too many electronic riffs compete with Thom Yorke’s characteristic falsetto, giving the songs a crowded feel. At the same time, however, the album feels unfinished.
Of course, none of the songs are danceable or singable, but this is normal for Radiohead.
What’s strange is the lack of any melody at all, just repeated electronic noise and a bass.
Take Radiohead’s first track of the album, “Bloom,” which begins with a very pretty piano riff. This lasts no longer than eight seconds before high-pitched beeps are added, the piano cutting out only to be replaced by pulsing electronic noise.
Another six seconds go by and a stilted, clattering drum beat is layered on top. Forty-five seconds pass before the bass is added, and so on.
Yorke begins singing over the chaos after about a minute, only adding to the clutter.
Listening to the song stresses me out–every time I hear something I like it fades away, and then a minute later it reappears only to cut out again.
The tracks following “Bloom” follow essentially the same pattern.
I don’t mean to entirely pan The King of Limbs, though. In “Lotus Flower,” the sheer craziness seemed to add to the song rather than take away from it.
The vocals are much more interesting, and there’s a little more balance between Yorke’s insane voice and the background noise.
“Lotus Flower’s” strangely enthralling and immensely enjoyable music video, featuring an insanely dancing Yorke gyrating convulsively to the beat, may have slightly skewed my perception of the song, however: I had no idea anybody could contort their body that way.
There was one other song that was genuinely likeable. “Codex” is a piano-fueled ballad that is powerful in it’s simplicity.
Yorke’s voice and haunting lyrics are the main attraction here, paired with the piano and light strings with a simple trumpet part. “Jump off the end/ The water’s clear/ And innocent,” Yorke warbles.
It’s the most minimalist song on the album, and it’s quite also the best.
I find that the Radiohead songs I actually tend to enjoy are the ones where words and phrases are actually discernable.
But The King of Limbs is not unenjoyable, it’s just not what fans were hoping for after Radiohead’s previous album, the masterpiece In Rainbows, the culmination of over two years of work.
With every record, Radiohead improved and expanded their experimental sound, but this eighth attempt seems to be a regression.
It’s unexciting and, after all the hype, disappointing.

By Hattie GawandeRadiohead is the band that every teenage alternative and/or indie rock fan theoretically adores.Specializing in electronic, guitar-driven songs, raw, wailing vocals and abstract lyrics, they are the definition of alternative.Unfortunately, what nobody really wants to admit is that no one can take them in anything but small doses. After a certain point, the lead singer, Thom Yorke, who may be considered a genius lyricist, is just profoundly creepy. Take “Climbing up the Walls”, a song off of their platinum selling record Ok Computer, in which Yorke howls “Fifteen blows to the back of your head/ Fifteen blows to your mind/ So lock up the kids safe tonight.”And this was before his bout of depression.Furthermore, after about twenty minutes, Yorke’s excessively wailing goes from expressive and haunting to so much inarticulate wailing.By the fourth or fifth song, all the tortured moaning sounds the same.Radiohead is also one of those bands that prefers experimentation over melody.Most songs do have some semblance of a tune, but it consists of Yorke’s howling rather than distinct chord progressions.It’s certainly not the sort of thing that you can sing along to. However, Radiohead has surprised us before. From time to time they put out an record that keeps being interesting.Their incredible second album, The Bends, a revolutionary piece of music (it’s considered to have opened the door for such contemporary English bands and musicians as Coldplay, Keane, and James Blunt), was one such record. Their wonderful seventh album, In Rainbows, released in 2007, was another. Unfortunately, their latest, The Kin of Limbs, is not.The eight songs on the 37-minute album are mostly typical Radiohead fare–the usual pulsing keyboards weave in and out of repetitive guitars and bass, all underpinned by delicate yet hyperactive drums.Too many electronic riffs compete with Thom Yorke’s characteristic falsetto, giving the songs a crowded feel. At the same time, however, the album feels unfinished.Of course, none of the songs are danceable or singable, but this is normal for Radiohead. What’s strange is the lack of any melody at all, just repeated electronic noise and a bass.Take Radiohead’s first track of the album, “Bloom,” which begins with a very pretty piano riff. This lasts no longer than eight seconds before high-pitched beeps are added, the piano cutting out only to be replaced by pulsing electronic noise.Another six seconds go by and a stilted, clattering drum beat is layered on top. Forty-five seconds pass before the bass is added, and so on.Yorke begins singing over the chaos after about a minute, only adding to the clutter. Listening to the song stresses me out–every time I hear something I like it fades away, and then a minute later it reappears only to cut out again.The tracks following “Bloom” follow essentially the same pattern. I don’t mean to entirely pan The King of Limbs, though. In “Lotus Flower,” the sheer craziness seemed to add to the song rather than take away from it.The vocals are much more interesting, and there’s a little more balance between Yorke’s insane voice and the background noise. “Lotus Flower’s” strangely enthralling and immensely enjoyable music video, featuring an insanely dancing Yorke gyrating convulsively to the beat, may have slightly skewed my perception of the song, however: I had no idea anybody could contort their body that way.There was one other song that was genuinely likeable. “Codex” is a piano-fueled ballad that is powerful in it’s simplicity.Yorke’s voice and haunting lyrics are the main attraction here, paired with the piano and light strings with a simple trumpet part. “Jump off the end/ The water’s clear/ And innocent,” Yorke warbles.It’s the most minimalist song on the album, and it’s quite also the best.I find that the Radiohead songs I actually tend to enjoy are the ones where words and phrases are actually discernable. But The King of Limbs is not unenjoyable, it’s just not what fans were hoping for after Radiohead’s previous album, the masterpiece In Rainbows, the culmination of over two years of work.With every record, Radiohead improved and expanded their experimental sound, but this eighth attempt seems to be a regression. It’s unexciting and, after all the hype, disappointing.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/the-king-of-limbs-but-nobody%e2%80%99s-dancing/feed/ 0
The Fashion Files http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/the-fashion-files/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/the-fashion-files/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:40:15 +0000 Helen Holmes http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5825 Rarely within the confines of the shiny, commercial, and deceptively safe bubble that surrounds the fashion industry does any sort of real controversy present itself.
Sure, you can compare two identically clad, rail-thin starlets and squabble over who wore it better, but such arguments aren’t exactly 60 Minutes material, and also generally make me want to die a swift and painful death.
As a result, whenever there’s any sort of real confrontation sharp enough to puncture that superficial bubble, heaven knows I’m going to pounce on it like the last warm M&M cookie at Panera.
As evidenced by the wildly different outfits that flounce down the runway every season year in and year out, inspiration can come from anywhere, and can mean something completely original to every creative mind committed to designing clothes.
Unfortunately, Kate and Laura Mulleavy, the women behind Rodarte, were unable to comprehend that some ideas are best left on the cutting board.
In 2009, the sisters embarked on a “road trip” from El Paso to Marfa, searching for something to spark ideas for their next collection.
Though they were probably anticipating nothing more than cute desert critters and some scenic  tumbleweed, what they found was Ciudad Juarez.
For those unaware, Juarez is a Mexican border city located across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas.
It is also the location of more than 400 female homicides since 1993, and that’s only the police force’s guess – the locals estimate that the carnage includes over 5,000 deaths of women mostly between the ages of 12 and 22.
Women aren’t the exclusive victims: what CNN calls “the most dangerous city in Mexico” racked up another 39 murders between this past Friday and Monday, mostly as a result of drug trafficking.
While any sane person would perceive this horrific community as a tragic hellhole for men and women alike, all Kate and Laura could see was dollar signs.  In late 2010, Rodarte launched a collaboration collection with makeup giant MAC, and there can be no mistaking the source of their inspiration.
A deathly pale lip product is entitled “Ghost Town.” Eye shadows tinged with bloody splashes of red boast names such as “Bordertown” and “Sleepwalker.” There’s even a jar of a product called “Lip Erase,” whose purpose is presumably to make the wearer appear as pale and emaciated as possible.
Promotional photos of the makeup show a bone-thin woman with eyes ringed by bruise-like eye shadow, staring bleakly into the camera. She looked dead, which was clearly the intention.
Needless to say, I was furious. In absolutely no context is it ever acceptable to market a death-themed product if the product is inspired by a place where death is all too real.
Not only this, but Rodarte and MAC had chosen to romanticize and commercialize the exploitation and murder of women, which to me bypasses offensive and closes in on disgusting.
Fortunately, I wasn’t the only one angered by the lack of propriety and blatantly ignorant nature of this collection.
Bloggers took to the Internet with a vengeance, forcing the partners to set up a fund to raise money for the women of Juarez to pacify the critics. This small positive measure, however, proved to be too late.
After several more subsequent promises from the embarrassed partners, the collection was canceled altogether.
What is important to take away from the carelessness of the Rodarte-MAC collaboration is that fashion, if left unchecked, can easily be both ignorant and downright stupid.
That is not to say that intelligent people cannot appreciate the aesthetic appeal of fashion.
However, stupidity is the existence of Lauren Conrad’s abysmal debut collection, and the reason why Mondo Guerra didn’t win season eight of Project Runway.
Ignorance is everywhere – in politics, in classrooms, and in industry.
Ultimately, fashion is as much a product of individual integrity and opinion as it is a result of factories and magazines.
Whether or not you choose to spend money on a product based on the demeaning and degradation of women, is up to you.

Rarely within the confines of the shiny, commercial, and deceptively safe bubble that surrounds the fashion industry does any sort of real controversy present itself. Sure, you can compare two identically clad, rail-thin starlets and squabble over who wore it better, but such arguments aren’t exactly 60 Minutes material, and also generally make me want to die a swift and painful death. As a result, whenever there’s any sort of real confrontation sharp enough to puncture that superficial bubble, heaven knows I’m going to pounce on it like the last warm M&M cookie at Panera. As evidenced by the wildly different outfits that flounce down the runway every season year in and year out, inspiration can come from anywhere, and can mean something completely original to every creative mind committed to designing clothes. Unfortunately, Kate and Laura Mulleavy, the women behind Rodarte, were unable to comprehend that some ideas are best left on the cutting board. In 2009, the sisters embarked on a “road trip” from El Paso to Marfa, searching for something to spark ideas for their next collection. Though they were probably anticipating nothing more than cute desert critters and some scenic  tumbleweed, what they found was Ciudad Juarez. For those unaware, Juarez is a Mexican border city located across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas. It is also the location of more than 400 female homicides since 1993, and that’s only the police force’s guess – the locals estimate that the carnage includes over 5,000 deaths of women mostly between the ages of 12 and 22. Women aren’t the exclusive victims: what CNN calls “the most dangerous city in Mexico” racked up another 39 murders between this past Friday and Monday, mostly as a result of drug trafficking. While any sane person would perceive this horrific community as a tragic hellhole for men and women alike, all Kate and Laura could see was dollar signs.  In late 2010, Rodarte launched a collaboration collection with makeup giant MAC, and there can be no mistaking the source of their inspiration. A deathly pale lip product is entitled “Ghost Town.” Eye shadows tinged with bloody splashes of red boast names such as “Bordertown” and “Sleepwalker.” There’s even a jar of a product called “Lip Erase,” whose purpose is presumably to make the wearer appear as pale and emaciated as possible. Promotional photos of the makeup show a bone-thin woman with eyes ringed by bruise-like eye shadow, staring bleakly into the camera. She looked dead, which was clearly the intention. Needless to say, I was furious. In absolutely no context is it ever acceptable to market a death-themed product if the product is inspired by a place where death is all too real. Not only this, but Rodarte and MAC had chosen to romanticize and commercialize the exploitation and murder of women, which to me bypasses offensive and closes in on disgusting. Fortunately, I wasn’t the only one angered by the lack of propriety and blatantly ignorant nature of this collection. Bloggers took to the Internet with a vengeance, forcing the partners to set up a fund to raise money for the women of Juarez to pacify the critics. This small positive measure, however, proved to be too late. After several more subsequent promises from the embarrassed partners, the collection was canceled altogether. What is important to take away from the carelessness of the Rodarte-MAC collaboration is that fashion, if left unchecked, can easily be both ignorant and downright stupid. That is not to say that intelligent people cannot appreciate the aesthetic appeal of fashion. However, stupidity is the existence of Lauren Conrad’s abysmal debut collection, and the reason why Mondo Guerra didn’t win season eight of Project Runway. Ignorance is everywhere – in politics, in classrooms, and in industry. Ultimately, fashion is as much a product of individual integrity and opinion as it is a result of factories and magazines. Whether or not you choose to spend money on a product based on the demeaning and degradation of women, is up to you.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/the-fashion-files/feed/ 0
Denebola presents: Tertulia in Pictures; A Spring Showcase http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/denebola-presents-tertulia-in-pictures-a-spring-showcase/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/denebola-presents-tertulia-in-pictures-a-spring-showcase/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:38:57 +0000 Jason Agress http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5745

MCs Jonah Ryder and Murray Levy invite lunch lady to introduce next performance

Senior Alex Gershanov street drumming

Nick Glavin gives a solo performance

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/denebola-presents-tertulia-in-pictures-a-spring-showcase/feed/ 0
South teen Camille Brugnara breaks free from depression http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/south-teen-camille-brugnara-breaks-free-from-depression/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/south-teen-camille-brugnara-breaks-free-from-depression/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:38:07 +0000 Rutul Patel http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5744 With the help of the Guidance Department head Shelly Borg and Goldrick Housemaster Henry Turner, South teen Camille Brugnara screened the film Breaking Free From Depression on April 5 2011 as a part of the Just Think Teens Making Smart Choices Expo.
Starting on April 4, the Expo was a week long fair held in various locations around Newton. The Expo’s highlights included seminars on students making healthy lifestyles and serious concerns such as depression.
“The [screening] was something that Camille wanted. She felt it important for the community to have access to this,” Borg said. “We know that people always have concerns about depression and this was a good way to reach them.”
After working with Doctor Naja Reily, the producer of the film, on spreading word about depression and conqueroring it, Brugnara asked to be in the film herself. She was then put into the movie.
“It felt good to [be in the film], because I felt like I could potentially make a difference in peoples lives who are suffering from mental illnesses,” Brugnara said.
85 people showed up for the film including members of the South community and faculty from other schools.
After the showing of the film, Camille and her mother gave a presentation on depression, Camille’s struggle through it, and facts and statistics. Doctors Andrew Aspel, Steven Litwack, and Naja Reily were present at the screening to give medical insight on the disease.
Breaking Free from

With the help of the Guidance Department head Shelly Borg and Goldrick Housemaster Henry Turner, South teen Camille Brugnara screened the film Breaking Free From Depression on April 5 2011 as a part of the Just Think Teens Making Smart Choices Expo.Starting on April 4, the Expo was a week long fair held in various locations around Newton. The Expo’s highlights included seminars on students making healthy lifestyles and serious concerns such as depression. “The [screening] was something that Camille wanted. She felt it important for the community to have access to this,” Borg said. “We know that people always have concerns about depression and this was a good way to reach them.”After working with Doctor Naja Reily, the producer of the film, on spreading word about depression and conqueroring it, Brugnara asked to be in the film herself. She was then put into the movie. “It felt good to [be in the film], because I felt like I could potentially make a difference in peoples lives who are suffering from mental illnesses,” Brugnara said. 85 people showed up for the film including members of the South community and faculty from other schools.After the showing of the film, Camille and her mother gave a presentation on depression, Camille’s struggle through it, and facts and statistics. Doctors Andrew Aspel, Steven Litwack, and Naja Reily were present at the screening to give medical insight on the disease. Breaking Free fromDepression followed teens and young adults from all different walks of life that had one indelible fact in common; they were all diagnosed with clinical depression.

Statistics show that 154 million people suffer from clinical depression, one in five teens in the US suffers through depression at least once and 80% of those kids go through this disease without being diagnosed or medically helped.

New England Patriots offensive tackle Matt Light hosted the movie. Light ushered the audience through the stories and personal accounts of teens that were dealing with depression.

“If you have an actual physical illness that people can see then they look at it differently as opposed to a mental one. It’s like I’m just sad. It’s a lot more than that,” explained Caroline Hanly, an 18-year old in the film.

Among the various teens interviewed in the film was Brugnara. Her parents saw the first signs of depression through her anger at a very young age.

“My parents noticed that I was a very angry two year old,” Brugnara said in the film.

The film then followed the signs and symptoms of depression which range from; lack of sleep, loss of appetite, withdrawal from the public, impulsive anger, mood swings.

“It felt like no matter what I did, none of my emotions would release,” Jachobie Cosom, another teen from the film, said.

The film then took a much darker turn as it examined the thoughts of suicide that most people going through depression go through.

“You feel like you’re on a cliff. You feel like you’re on a cliff and you’re ready to jump and you know no one is going to stop you,” Cosom said.

“You just want to get rid of everything that you’re feeling. And just be done with everything. You never look at the positive things,” Hanly said.

“I tried to kill myself and that’s the realest it ever got with depression and me. And then I vowed to someone I love a lot that I would never try it again,” Igor Frieire, a teen interviewed in the film, said.

“Learning from yesterday, living for today, and loving tomorrow,” is how Cosom describes his view on life after his stint with depression.

Burgnara also has had her moments of triumph over her depression. She explains in the film that after being with depression she took up the hobby of glass blowing, a form of art in which the artist morphs hot glass into what their imagination wills it to be.

“In life sometimes we try and focus on everyone else and pleasing everyone else, when sometimes we have to take time for ourselves and treat ourselves with love, kindness, and respect. A key aspect [of overcoming depression] was the importance of art and sports. Having an outlet for emotions,” Brugnara said.

Borg counted this screening as a great success and “wonderful” use of the expo. “It takes a lot of courage to talk about something you’ve suffered through,” Borg said. “It was a gift for us to hear about and for her to talk about.”

“My goal with doing and screening the movie was to let people know that you can overcome depression. And ultimately I hope that if I can help one person then they’ll help another and so on. Baby steps,” Brugnara said.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/south-teen-camille-brugnara-breaks-free-from-depression/feed/ 0