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Denebola » Nathan Baskin http://www.denebolaonline.net The Award-Winning, Official School Newspaper of Newton South High School, Newton, MA Fri, 17 Jun 2011 02:00:19 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.2 Shot put hopeful for season http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/shot-put-hopeful-for-season/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/shot-put-hopeful-for-season/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:26:30 +0000 Nathan Baskin http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5809
Seniors Brandon Caldwell and Alex Karys have been throwing shot put since last year and have enjoyed playing the sport.
The sport was introduced in the original Olympic games in Athens, Greece, and is a growing sport. The shot is 12 pounds but Karys does not discourage anyone from participating in the event, due to fear of injury.
Karys expects to attend Furman University in South Carolina, and wants to throw shot put during his college years.
The main objective of the sport is simply to “throw” a lead ball farther than the other competitors. Each athlete has to throw the ball from a circle called the pit; crossing the pit results in a foul, which causes the athlete to lose his or her turn for the round. The shot putters have three turns to throw the shot put and the best score is kept, while the two worst are ignored.
The average of Caldwell and Karys’s throws is approximately 40 feet. To train for shot put, Karys uses a very rigorous workout schedule.
He also plays football for South and participates in high jump. According to Karys, shot put involves a lot of muscle, but also involves a lot of footwork and thought. He believes footwork is one of the most important qualities of premier shot putters.
Caldwell and Karys are the oldest members of the team, but are also joined by six underclassmen consisting of both boys and girls.
Shot putters at South have not had much support at their events. Not enough fans show up, but Karys enjoys the sport regardless, hoping that in the future shot will have a bigger fanbase then it has now.
As the season gets under way, Karys has high expectations for the team and hopes they can make it to the State tournament.

By Nathan BaskinSeniors Brandon Caldwell and Alex Karys have been throwing shot put since last year and have enjoyed playing the sport. The sport was introduced in the original Olympic games in Athens, Greece, and is a growing sport. The shot is 12 pounds but Karys does not discourage anyone from participating in the event, due to fear of injury.Karys expects to attend Furman University in South Carolina, and wants to throw shot put during his college years.The main objective of the sport is simply to “throw” a lead ball farther than the other competitors. Each athlete has to throw the ball from a circle called the pit; crossing the pit results in a foul, which causes the athlete to lose his or her turn for the round. The shot putters have three turns to throw the shot put and the best score is kept, while the two worst are ignored.The average of Caldwell and Karys’s throws is approximately 40 feet. To train for shot put, Karys uses a very rigorous workout schedule.He also plays football for South and participates in high jump. According to Karys, shot put involves a lot of muscle, but also involves a lot of footwork and thought. He believes footwork is one of the most important qualities of premier shot putters.Caldwell and Karys are the oldest members of the team, but are also joined by six underclassmen consisting of both boys and girls. Shot putters at South have not had much support at their events. Not enough fans show up, but Karys enjoys the sport regardless, hoping that in the future shot will have a bigger fanbase then it has now.As the season gets under way, Karys has high expectations for the team and hopes they can make it to the State tournament.

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Ageless Athletes: Matthew Anderson http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/ageless-athletes-matthew-anderson/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/ageless-athletes-matthew-anderson/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:24:15 +0000 Nathan Baskin http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5806
When he was 15 years old, he could dunk: on a full-size basketball hoop When he was at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst he played under legendary National Collegiate Athletic Association coach John Calipari.
And and when was a graduate student there he also helped coach an National Basketball Association NBA defensive player of the year, Marcus Camby.
Matthew Anderson, a math teacher at South, grew up in Brewster, New York. At Brewster High School, Anderson played basketball and soccer and ran track.
But his real gift was basketball.  When he was six years old, he first picked up the game of basketball and at 15 years old, he was 6 feet 8 inches.
He was a standout high school player and a top recruit during his high school career.  Anderson’s grades off the court made him an interest to such elite Ivy League schools as Harvard and Cornell universities.
His final decision was to come play for John Calipari, who was the Head Coach of the UMass Minutemen at the time.  Anderson said that for him, the hardest transition was “switching from being a Yankees fan to a Red Sox fan.”
Anderson had a extraordinary career in high school, averaging a double double per game, and even recording a rare basketball achievement and a quadruple double which consisted 12 points, 15 rebounds, ten assists and 12 blocks.
Anderson received his high school diploma in 1987 and came to UMass early for the season.  “Calipari was a great coach, and always stressed perfection,” Anderson said.
Anderson and the Minutemen had to run a drill called “perfection” during practice, which consisted of simple pick and rolls, and give-and -goes.
If it was not executed perfectly the players would need to start over.  Calipari was a young coach, but a strict coach too, who had no tolerance for people who were late.
“Calipari’s policy was if you were a minute late for practice, you had to come in the next morning at 4 AM and start running,” Anderson said.
At UMass, Anderson was not the only tall player; the team had many. Anderson realized he was not the best player, but was a key member of the bench and contributed on the boards and with blocks.
Anderson also did not mind not starting, being part of the team meant a lot. UMass got better every year, and with players like Anderson, reached the tournament level, losing in the Sweet 16 to Kentucky during the 1992 tournament.
“The hardest thing to manage was the school work you missed when you were on the road,” Anderson said.
To cope with this, he tried to take more classes over the summer before the basketball season began.
The team provided many tutors when they were away and according to Anderson, “Calipari was very serious when it came to academics.”
After realizing the NBA was not for him, Anderson left UMass after graduating and began working different jobs.
He was a salesman and a Transportation Security Authority airport security officer, which Anderson says “was fun,” but  what he finally realized after a time was that he wanted was to return to college studies.
He wanted to go to graduate school, and also asked Calipari if he had a job for him at UMass.
He did, and Anderson was given a tutoring job as a graduate student.  He would help the players with schoolwork on the road, and would mentor them on the court.
It was on this job that Anderson met Marcus Camby, who he described as a “7-foot monster that could run like a deer.”
Camby was the best player that Calipari had coached at UMass and made everyone feel his presence when he was on the court.
By the end of the 1996 season, everyone knew who Camby was; he was the train that led the Minutemen surge throughout the tournament.
“The most amazing thing about Camby was that he never got into trouble off the court, and he always got good grades.”
Anderson said he was not one of the kids you had to tell to do well in school; he did it himself without prompting. Anderson said his greatest achievement was getting the Minutemen to the NIT final Four.
He said it was the greatest achievement ever.  Anderson stopped playing basketball after a freak accident, when he fell off a roof while fixing it.
He stopped playing the sport because of the injury, but he has now been helping his two-year-old learn the craft of the game.
He is the coach of the Freshmen Basketball team and says that there are many people with talent on the team.
Anderson is a great teacher at South, and one of the elite athletes that South has on its staff.

By Nathan BaskinWhen he was 15 years old, he could dunk: on a full-size basketball hoop When he was at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst he played under legendary National Collegiate Athletic Association coach John Calipari. And and when was a graduate student there he also helped coach an National Basketball Association NBA defensive player of the year, Marcus Camby. Matthew Anderson, a math teacher at South, grew up in Brewster, New York. At Brewster High School, Anderson played basketball and soccer and ran track.  But his real gift was basketball.  When he was six years old, he first picked up the game of basketball and at 15 years old, he was 6 feet 8 inches.He was a standout high school player and a top recruit during his high school career.  Anderson’s grades off the court made him an interest to such elite Ivy League schools as Harvard and Cornell universities.  His final decision was to come play for John Calipari, who was the Head Coach of the UMass Minutemen at the time.  Anderson said that for him, the hardest transition was “switching from being a Yankees fan to a Red Sox fan.”  Anderson had a extraordinary career in high school, averaging a double double per game, and even recording a rare basketball achievement and a quadruple double which consisted 12 points, 15 rebounds, ten assists and 12 blocks.  Anderson received his high school diploma in 1987 and came to UMass early for the season.  “Calipari was a great coach, and always stressed perfection,” Anderson said.  Anderson and the Minutemen had to run a drill called “perfection” during practice, which consisted of simple pick and rolls, and give-and -goes. If it was not executed perfectly the players would need to start over.  Calipari was a young coach, but a strict coach too, who had no tolerance for people who were late.  “Calipari’s policy was if you were a minute late for practice, you had to come in the next morning at 4 AM and start running,” Anderson said.  At UMass, Anderson was not the only tall player; the team had many. Anderson realized he was not the best player, but was a key member of the bench and contributed on the boards and with blocks.  Anderson also did not mind not starting, being part of the team meant a lot. UMass got better every year, and with players like Anderson, reached the tournament level, losing in the Sweet 16 to Kentucky during the 1992 tournament. “The hardest thing to manage was the school work you missed when you were on the road,” Anderson said.  To cope with this, he tried to take more classes over the summer before the basketball season began.  The team provided many tutors when they were away and according to Anderson, “Calipari was very serious when it came to academics.”After realizing the NBA was not for him, Anderson left UMass after graduating and began working different jobs. He was a salesman and a Transportation Security Authority airport security officer, which Anderson says “was fun,” but  what he finally realized after a time was that he wanted was to return to college studies.  He wanted to go to graduate school, and also asked Calipari if he had a job for him at UMass.  He did, and Anderson was given a tutoring job as a graduate student.  He would help the players with schoolwork on the road, and would mentor them on the court.It was on this job that Anderson met Marcus Camby, who he described as a “7-foot monster that could run like a deer.”  Camby was the best player that Calipari had coached at UMass and made everyone feel his presence when he was on the court. By the end of the 1996 season, everyone knew who Camby was; he was the train that led the Minutemen surge throughout the tournament.  “The most amazing thing about Camby was that he never got into trouble off the court, and he always got good grades.” Anderson said he was not one of the kids you had to tell to do well in school; he did it himself without prompting. Anderson said his greatest achievement was getting the Minutemen to the NIT final Four.  He said it was the greatest achievement ever.  Anderson stopped playing basketball after a freak accident, when he fell off a roof while fixing it.  He stopped playing the sport because of the injury, but he has now been helping his two-year-old learn the craft of the game.  He is the coach of the Freshmen Basketball team and says that there are many people with talent on the team.  Anderson is a great teacher at South, and one of the elite athletes that South has on its staff.

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Ageless Athletes: Kara Henry http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/03/23/ageless-athletes-kara-henry-2/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/03/23/ageless-athletes-kara-henry-2/#comments Wed, 23 Mar 2011 04:30:08 +0000 Nathan Baskin http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5590 Kara Henry is not a stereotypical “History” teacher. Many students who have her enjoy her class, as her enthusiatic and imagintive teaching style attracts many seniors each year.

She interacts with her students in a fun and positive manner and creates a strong connection with them. Along with being a respected teacher-as-teacher Henry is also an outstanding athlete, and has been one throughout her life.

Henry grew up in a rural environment, Newtown, Connecticut. As a freshman at Newtown High, Henry excelled in both academics and athletics.

She made the Girls’ Varsity Lacrosse team her freshmen year, and continued her love for the game, playing during all four years of her high school career. In addition to Lacrosse, she played Junior Varsity Girls’ Soccer during her freshmen year and Varsity Soccer her sophomore year.

However, only being a two-sport athlete did not satisfy her needs, as following her sophomore year she took up Swimming and Diving.

“I mostly dove,” Henry said. “But I swam a few events too, like 100 breaststroke, 100 free style, and the medley relay. According to Henry, she won more games than she lost during her high school career.

Naturally, Henry pursued her athletic career on the college level. She attended Lafayette where she played one year of Girls’ Division 1AA Lacrosse, and played the increasingly popular sport of Rugby at the club level for two years.

At Lafayette she had to manage her athletic commitment and her love of history. “[I did better] inseason academically as you might imagine than during the offseason,” Henry said.

Throughout her athletic career, her coaches knew that academics are more important than athletics. “All my coaches were teachers and made sure I did well academically,” she said. At Lafayette she worked to balance her athletic activity with her serious academic responsibilities.

“During practice I was required to run four to five times a week,” Henry said. In her sophomore year she stopped playing but was still a big supporter of the Leopards.

Since moving to her “new” Newton and leaving Connecticut behind, she found her new home at South, where she teaches in the History Department and coaches three sports: Girls’ Diving, Boys’ Diving and Boys’ Lacrosse.

Henry is acknowledged as an inspiration to all the athletes that had the opportunity to play for her. “She really helped me improve my overall game,” sophomore Sam Houston-Reed said.

The only female involved in the Boys’ Lacrosse program. Henry says the reason she coaches Boys’ Lacrosse at South is because she still misses the sport environment and the spotlight.

Henry, like many athletes, has a challenge ahead of her. Her goal is to win a 10K marathon in September. To get in shape for it, Henry follows an intense workout regiment.

“I usually run three to four times a week,” Henry said. “This helps me stay in shape.” During the summers she loves to run near the fence at Fenway Park, where she rides her bike and runs on the weekends.

She also hopes to participate in a triathlon soon. However, she is not enthusiastic about all of it; she is excited about participating in the swimming and running part, but is scared to be biking with many other participants around her.

Henry is eager to continue her pursuit of athletics; yoga seems to be next on the horizon for the three-sport coach, runner, rock climber, and full-time teacher.

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