Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/denebolasandbox/denebola_2009/wp-includes/ms-load.php on line 113

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/denebolasandbox/denebola_2009/wp-includes/ms-load.php:113) in /home/denebolasandbox/denebola_2009/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php on line 8
Denebola » Liana Butchard http://www.denebolaonline.net The Award-Winning, Official School Newspaper of Newton South High School, Newton, MA Fri, 17 Jun 2011 02:00:19 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.2 One too many could shatter the glass house: the honors debacle http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/one-too-many-could-shatter-the-glass-house-the-honors-debacle/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/one-too-many-could-shatter-the-glass-house-the-honors-debacle/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:16:22 +0000 Liana Butchard http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5797 By Liana Butchard
and Jesse Feldstein
3.34, 4.56, and 2.51 may just seem like numbers, but to some high school students at Newton South these numbers are their future.
“How many honors are you taking?”
As we start course registration for the 2011-2012 year, this seems to be the question that everyone is asking.  Some people love answering this with the long list of difficult classes that they are taking next year.
This isn’t true for other students, however,  and hearing this bragging often produces a winner and a victim.  There is the assumption that everyone takes many honors classes, but this corollary is more a myth than a fact.
South is quite an academically competitive high school and many students push themselves very hard.  The question is: how hard is too hard?
There are many factors that should be considered before students add an honors class to their schedules.
There seems to be common thought that everyone takes honors classes.
“Only about half of the students at South take honors classes.  You can get into good schools [colleges] without them,” guidance counselor Lenny Libenzon said.
With all of the pressure that is put on so many students, it seems that some of them should just take a deep breath and relax.
The classes that you take are not going to take over the path for what you do later in life.  That being said, slacking off isn’t answer either; the point is to try hard, but don’t kill yourself.
Other interests such as sports are important, too.  Freshman Daniel Friedman plays soccer, wrestles, and runs track, meaning that he already has a lot going on in addition to his school work.  “I want to stay a three season athlete, and doing a bunch of honors classes would be too much for me,” Friedman said.
Numerous students are enrolled and continue to enroll in honors courses.  Sophomore Kitty Crowley is taking two honors courses, and she finds them to be interesting and stimulating.
“I pick honors courses based on whether or not I like them. The GPA is just an extra boost,” Crowley said.
She believes that being interested in a subject is what should factor into whether or not a student takes an honors course. When Crowley makes her choice, she thinks about what will interest her regardless of what her teachers suggest.
This year Kitty is taking honors chorus because she likes singing and music. Crowley figures, “If I was going to do it, why not get the extra credit? I enjoy chorus, and that is why I signed up, and the boosted GPA isn’t bad either.”
Another thing to consider is the time commitment.
Taking an honors class usually means at least an hour or two of homework per night.  That’s not too bad for one or two classes, but any more and it will really start to add up.
Staying up to all hours of the night isn’t a good idea.
Most doctors say that teenagers need eight and one half to nine hours of sleep per night to really excel during the day.  Countless hours of homework won’t get you even close to that.
Many teachers like the Goldrick House-Master Mr. Turner agree that taking more difficult classes and then staying up way too late is not a good plan.  “Honors classes are very challenging and require a lot of outside class time.   Staying up until one or two o’clock every night is not realistic,” Turner said.
Taking this into consideration, some students plan their schedule around getting extra time during the day to get homework done. Take freshman Anna Alsop who has chosen to take four honors classes next year, but is leaving several potential elective blocks open, so that she can have time do get work done during the school day.  “Right now I want to take as many honors classes as I can, but I’m leaving a lot of time to deal with the workload.  If I plan out my time then I think that I will be fine,” Alsop said.
Many students will take an honors class in a subject that they hate just for the honors credit.  “I’m not going to take an honors class just to take it.  The honors classes that I’m taking are ones that I’m actually interested in,” freshman Emily Kaufman said.
If a class or subject is enjoyable or interesting, then it is probably more likely that one would take away a lot from it.
Kaufman thinks that it is silly to stress over an honors class that you don’t even remotely like or want to take.
And the classes are stressful: “The more that you take, the more stressful it will be,” Turner said.
Many students are often stuck in a conundrum about whether or not they will fit in the new learning environment.
For all the irresolute students sophomore Jack Rice offers some personal advice. “I worry about what suits me. What am I capable of doing? It is absolutely an individual choice. Teachers and parents should only offer a suggestion, but I decide what classes I take,” said Rice.
Often times, however, a student’s decision is influenced by the thoughts of a teacher.
Christopher Jackson, a world language teacher at Newton South has been helping students make their choices for years.
“It is only more work for no reason if you do not enjoy the material. That is why a student must express interest before I talk to them about the option of honors,” remarked Jackson.
Jackson believes the “atmosphere is more productive” in an honors course because each student is genuinely devoted to the curriculum.
“That doesn’t mean there is less stress. Students have to pick and choose because if they took all honors it would simply be too overwhelming,” said Jackson. “Ultimately students get more out of it and every method of teaching just seems to work in my honors classes.”
Jackson believes that the enthusiasm is increased in an honors environment and the teachers are happy which in turn makes the students happy.
In the end, the power is in the hands of each student. Regardless of how many—if any—honors classes you are planning on taking, they are something to think about carefully.
Course selection is just one of many challenging decisions each student makes throughout their career at Newton South. Perhaps this decision can be utilized as a rare opportunity for a challenge.

By Liana Butchard and Jesse Feldstein3.34, 4.56, and 2.51 may just seem like numbers, but to some high school students at Newton South these numbers are their future. “How many honors are you taking?”   As we start course registration for the 2011-2012 year, this seems to be the question that everyone is asking.  Some people love answering this with the long list of difficult classes that they are taking next year.  This isn’t true for other students, however,  and hearing this bragging often produces a winner and a victim.  There is the assumption that everyone takes many honors classes, but this corollary is more a myth than a fact. South is quite an academically competitive high school and many students push themselves very hard.  The question is: how hard is too hard?  There are many factors that should be considered before students add an honors class to their schedules.There seems to be common thought that everyone takes honors classes.  “Only about half of the students at South take honors classes.  You can get into good schools [colleges] without them,” guidance counselor Lenny Libenzon said.  With all of the pressure that is put on so many students, it seems that some of them should just take a deep breath and relax. The classes that you take are not going to take over the path for what you do later in life.  That being said, slacking off isn’t answer either; the point is to try hard, but don’t kill yourself.  Other interests such as sports are important, too.  Freshman Daniel Friedman plays soccer, wrestles, and runs track, meaning that he already has a lot going on in addition to his school work.  “I want to stay a three season athlete, and doing a bunch of honors classes would be too much for me,” Friedman said.Numerous students are enrolled and continue to enroll in honors courses.  Sophomore Kitty Crowley is taking two honors courses, and she finds them to be interesting and stimulating.“I pick honors courses based on whether or not I like them. The GPA is just an extra boost,” Crowley said. She believes that being interested in a subject is what should factor into whether or not a student takes an honors course. When Crowley makes her choice, she thinks about what will interest her regardless of what her teachers suggest.  This year Kitty is taking honors chorus because she likes singing and music. Crowley figures, “If I was going to do it, why not get the extra credit? I enjoy chorus, and that is why I signed up, and the boosted GPA isn’t bad either.”Another thing to consider is the time commitment.  Taking an honors class usually means at least an hour or two of homework per night.  That’s not too bad for one or two classes, but any more and it will really start to add up.  Staying up to all hours of the night isn’t a good idea.  Most doctors say that teenagers need eight and one half to nine hours of sleep per night to really excel during the day.  Countless hours of homework won’t get you even close to that.  Many teachers like the Goldrick House-Master Mr. Turner agree that taking more difficult classes and then staying up way too late is not a good plan.  “Honors classes are very challenging and require a lot of outside class time.   Staying up until one or two o’clock every night is not realistic,” Turner said.Taking this into consideration, some students plan their schedule around getting extra time during the day to get homework done. Take freshman Anna Alsop who has chosen to take four honors classes next year, but is leaving several potential elective blocks open, so that she can have time do get work done during the school day.  “Right now I want to take as many honors classes as I can, but I’m leaving a lot of time to deal with the workload.  If I plan out my time then I think that I will be fine,” Alsop said.Many students will take an honors class in a subject that they hate just for the honors credit.  “I’m not going to take an honors class just to take it.  The honors classes that I’m taking are ones that I’m actually interested in,” freshman Emily Kaufman said.  If a class or subject is enjoyable or interesting, then it is probably more likely that one would take away a lot from it. Kaufman thinks that it is silly to stress over an honors class that you don’t even remotely like or want to take.  And the classes are stressful: “The more that you take, the more stressful it will be,” Turner said.Many students are often stuck in a conundrum about whether or not they will fit in the new learning environment. For all the irresolute students sophomore Jack Rice offers some personal advice. “I worry about what suits me. What am I capable of doing? It is absolutely an individual choice. Teachers and parents should only offer a suggestion, but I decide what classes I take,” said Rice.Often times, however, a student’s decision is influenced by the thoughts of a teacher. Christopher Jackson, a world language teacher at Newton South has been helping students make their choices for years.“It is only more work for no reason if you do not enjoy the material. That is why a student must express interest before I talk to them about the option of honors,” remarked Jackson. Jackson believes the “atmosphere is more productive” in an honors course because each student is genuinely devoted to the curriculum.“That doesn’t mean there is less stress. Students have to pick and choose because if they took all honors it would simply be too overwhelming,” said Jackson. “Ultimately students get more out of it and every method of teaching just seems to work in my honors classes.”Jackson believes that the enthusiasm is increased in an honors environment and the teachers are happy which in turn makes the students happy.In the end, the power is in the hands of each student. Regardless of how many—if any—honors classes you are planning on taking, they are something to think about carefully.  Course selection is just one of many challenging decisions each student makes throughout their career at Newton South. Perhaps this decision can be utilized as a rare opportunity for a challenge.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/one-too-many-could-shatter-the-glass-house-the-honors-debacle/feed/ 0
New England’s fall pastimes http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/10/28/new-englands-fall-pastimes/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/10/28/new-englands-fall-pastimes/#comments Thu, 28 Oct 2010 07:06:55 +0000 Liana Butchard http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=4889 What else could brisk weather and leaves changing color mean but the return of fall?
Now officially about a month into fall, we must let go of summer thoughts and focus instead on exciting fall activities.
Having to pull out a coat to bundle up in the biting wind isn’t necessarily ideal, but there are many fun seasonal activities to take advantage of.
Be it apple picking, raking leaves, or dressing up for that special holiday at the end of October, fall offers endless possibilities. New England, home to many apple orchards, is the perfect place to go apple picking. Some popular orchards are the Nashoba Valley Winery and the Belkin Family Lookout Farm which has both apples and pumpkins.
After picking the apples, the next step of course is to make apple pie. This “classic American food is perfect for a cool fall day especially when topped with vanilla ice cream. Caramel apples are another popular treat made with apples.
Another traditional fall activity is raking leaves.
“I love raking leaves and then jumping into them, freshman Sienna Jackson-Unger said.
It is even a money-making opportunity if your neighbors are looking for someone to rake their leaves for them. Perhaps the most popular day in fall is October 31st: Halloween.
And who wouldn’t love a holiday that gives you an excuse to dress up and beg for candy and treats?
Deciding what to dress up is a crucial decision. Some of the most popular costumes for 2010 are Lady Gaga, Jersey Shore characters, and characters from the movie Avatar. Many also opt for a classic costume such as a witch or ghost, which never seem to go out of style.
Unfortunately, this year Halloween falls on a Sunday. Despite how this might limit Halloween festivities, there are still tons of fun things to do.
Carving pumpkins is an easy way to get into the Halloween spirit. There are also “fright nights at the 3-D Davis Mega Maze in Sterling, MA on Friday and Saturday nights leading up to Halloween.
Before you know it, snow will coat the ground and the winter blues will kick in. Now is the time to experience and enjoy the fall.
Halloween is approaching rapidly and there are endless fun opportunities to enjoy both that, and autumn overall.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/10/28/new-englands-fall-pastimes/feed/ 0
The trend: Silly Bandz http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/09/30/the-trend-silly-bandz/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/09/30/the-trend-silly-bandz/#comments Thu, 30 Sep 2010 06:06:12 +0000 Liana Butchard http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=4644 From Uggs to Webkinz, it seems that there is always a new fad. The latest fad that has become increasingly popular since this summer are Silly Bandz, colorful rubber bands in all different shapes that are worn around the wrist. They are sold in packs based on the theme of the shapes, such as food, animals, letters, and more.
“I think that they are awesome, Williams fifth grader Nora Greeley said. She then adds that the newest trend is to “wear the Silly Bandz rings on your hoop earrings.
Many would think that these would be popular mostly among elementary and middle school age kids, however many teenagers and young adults are also crazy for them.
Senior Rachel Davidson, for example, proudly states that she has a collection of nearly 300 Silly Bandz and wears about 50 on her wrist on an average day. “I am addicted. I can’t leave the house without them or else my wrist and fingers feel too bare, Davidson said.
When asked why she loves Silly Bandz so much, Davidson said, “they are just really fun and expressive. It’s really fun to trade them. I get to lay out my entire pile and see all the ones I have. Truthfully, I have an emotional connection to some of my silly bands.
As Davidson pointed out, trading is one of the most popular things to do with Silly Bandz.
“When I first met my co-counselors at camp, it was a little awkward but we actually bonded by trading Silly Bandz, Davidson said.
Many people trade with other to try and get the “rare bands.  “I really want the rarest one, which is a black flashlight, Williams fifth Grader Melissa Butchard said.
Even adults have gotten in on the trend.  Some younger adults use trading Silly Bandz as a flirting tactic.
According to New York Daily News, some adults find it easier to approach another adult in a bar or club with Silly Bandz as opposed to a pick-up line.
Others, however, are less taken by this new fad. Freshman Andrew Cheung thinks that “they are not worth it and extremely overpriced.
“I think that they are cute, but we will look back and wonder why we spent so much money on overpriced rubber bands, freshman Minh-An Quinn said.
Some schools have even banned them due to how distracting the trading can be.  “Silly Bandz are allowed at Williams, but the teachers hate them, Butchard said.
Medically, it is suspected that the bands could cause circulation problems.
“These bands could cause what we call a tourniquet effect that can cause your veins to get congested. The bracelets could cause blood clots to form in some of the veins, giving someone a phlebitis, which is an inflammation and clotting of the vein, Dr. Gregory Simonian, chief of endovascular surgery and director of the Heart Vascular Hospital at Hackensack University Medical Center, said.
Many kids wear their bands up to their elbows which puts them at a serious risk.  Most doctors agree that a few of the bands are fine, but it becomes a problem when the bands could possibly be cuttng off circulation.
“If the bracelet is causing a significant indentation in the skin and the tissue, causing arm swelling, a change in feeling like numbness or tingling, or color change, those are all signs that the bands are constricting and need to be cut off immediately, Simonian said.
Regardless of these medical concerns, our nation is now overrun with the colorful shaped bands, and they don’t appear to be going away soon.

]]>
http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/09/30/the-trend-silly-bandz/feed/ 0