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Denebola » Courtney Foster http://www.denebolaonline.net The Award-Winning, Official School Newspaper of Newton South High School, Newton, MA Fri, 17 Jun 2011 02:00:19 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.2 A growing flair for facial hair beyond compare in South http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/a-growing-flair-for-facial-hair-beyond-compare-in-south/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/a-growing-flair-for-facial-hair-beyond-compare-in-south/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:13:24 +0000 Courtney Foster http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5795 By Courtney Foster
What do Abe Lincoln, Santa Claus, and Conan O’Brien all have in common? Check their faces.
Now more than ever,  the latest hot fashion is: the styling of facial hair.
We see celebrities and teachers alike sporting carefully and diligently shaped beards. Although the stars may have their beards masterminded by expensive stylists, the unshaven educators in Newton simply have a different opinion: the beard selects the man, not the other way around.
“I can’t say that I ‘chose’ it,” Physics teacher Alexander Kraus said. “I wanted facial hair, but not a full beard.”
Others, such as Fine Arts Coordinator Jeff Knoedler go as far as to personify their beards.
“I didn’t really choose my beard style,” Knoedler said. “It chose me.”
Still, a select few not only give their beards personalities, but, in contrast, let their beards rule over them completely.
“You don’t choose your beard,” French teacher Sebastien Merle said. “Your beard chooses you, and then you comply with what it has decided for you.”
These teachers also come to the consensus that a hairdresser to tame one’s beard is unnecessary.
“[My beard is created solely by] my face and me,” Knoedler said, as does Merle, denoting that his beard is “all [him].”
Whether a recent development or not, it is clear that once a beard is grown it stays, for one reason or another.
Kraus was looking to appear wise beyond his years when he chose to grow out his facial hair.
“I’ve had the beard for about four years,” Kraus said. “I originally grew it to make myself look older. As a short, young teacher, it helped distinguish me from students. In my first couple years at South, the cafeteria workers thought I was a student and would charge me the student lunch rate until I corrected them.”
Merle was taken aback when he realized he had the ability to grow a beard and continues to sport one for his own personal pleasure.
“For most of my twenties, I wasn’t able to grow a full beard; it was really spotty,” Merle said. “I stopped shaving during Spring break two years ago, and much to my surprise, it looked pretty full. So I decided to keep it for a while. I haven’t shaved since.”
For Knoedler, the beard is a relatively new addition to his look. He did enjoy how it looked on him when he grew it out two months ago, but outside influence from a significant other was involved in his decision to stop shaving.
“[I’ve had my beard] since February break. I didn’t shave over vacation, then just decided to keep it when my wife mentioned she liked it,” Knoedler said. “How can I shave it after that?”
There are discrepancies over the net effects of the beard on the wearer of the beard and those experiencing it from afar. Some believe a beard can only have a positive impact on one’s character.
“There are only advantages to having a beard,” Merle said, although he did not specify what those advantages are.
In contrast, others will have problems with their facial hair from time to time.
“If it gets long, it can get kind of itchy,” Kraus said.
Although Merle’s family would rather see his chin bare and hairless, his friends find his beard amusing and appropriate considering the steryotypic image of a bearded professor.
“My family hates [my facial hair] with a passion,” Merle said. “My friends seem to find it quite fitting, considering my professorial occupation.”
Knoedler’s son objects to his beard, but Knoedler himself is largely a fan of it and feels that it augments his already good looks.
“My son complains it pokes him when I kiss him,” Knoedler said. “[However] I think I’m incredibly handsome. My beard really pushes my handsomeness over the top. My friends are all very jealous.”
Beards definitely evoke a myriad of reactions amongst the ladies. South girls in general seem to have reservations about beards, preferring that guys shave or at most leave their beards modest and well kept.
“Honestly, I like the clean shaven look best, but some guys can really rock the beards,” freshman Sophie Cash said.
“I don’t mind beards, but only if they are short and neat,” sophomore Gil Blume said. “[But] once it goes lumberjack-long, it’s time to shave. Mr. Merle has the perfect type of beard. Just putting it out there” Blume said.
One student, when comparing her father’s facial hair perceptions living in the Northern region versus the Southern region of the United States, believes opinions regarding beards are regionally developed.
“When my dad came up here from down South, he said it was harder to get a job up North with a beard,” freshman Leah Jacobson said. “Up here, large beards mean creepy.”
Still, unique and original beards are appreciated.
“I mostly like facial hair when it’s entertaining or weird, but not really for attractiveness’ sake,” Cash said.
Freshman Natalie Silverman has a strong opinion about who should and shouldn’t have beards. She believes facial hair on South students doesn’t make the cut.
“I think that facial hair on students is gross,” Silverman said. “I mean, we’re still kids, kind of, and it’s just weird seeing a fifteen year old with a full beard and mustache. ”
Even Silverman, though, will admit that the right type of facial hair on the right type of person can look attractive.
“With more mature and older men, beards and mustaches can look good. Not like a lumberjack-man kind of facial hair, but something subtle.”
Silverman shares a similar opinion with many others about the pros and cons of facial hair. She too is quick to highlight its benefits. Both in and outside of the South community, beards are definitely in style.
“Someone like Adam Levine or Joe Jonas,” Silverman said. “That look is, well… sexy.”

By Courtney FosterWhat do Abe Lincoln, Santa Claus, and Conan O’Brien all have in common? Check their faces. Now more than ever,  the latest hot fashion is: the styling of facial hair.We see celebrities and teachers alike sporting carefully and diligently shaped beards. Although the stars may have their beards masterminded by expensive stylists, the unshaven educators in Newton simply have a different opinion: the beard selects the man, not the other way around. “I can’t say that I ‘chose’ it,” Physics teacher Alexander Kraus said. “I wanted facial hair, but not a full beard.”Others, such as Fine Arts Coordinator Jeff Knoedler go as far as to personify their beards.“I didn’t really choose my beard style,” Knoedler said. “It chose me.”Still, a select few not only give their beards personalities, but, in contrast, let their beards rule over them completely.“You don’t choose your beard,” French teacher Sebastien Merle said. “Your beard chooses you, and then you comply with what it has decided for you.”These teachers also come to the consensus that a hairdresser to tame one’s beard is unnecessary.“[My beard is created solely by] my face and me,” Knoedler said, as does Merle, denoting that his beard is “all [him].”Whether a recent development or not, it is clear that once a beard is grown it stays, for one reason or another.Kraus was looking to appear wise beyond his years when he chose to grow out his facial hair.“I’ve had the beard for about four years,” Kraus said. “I originally grew it to make myself look older. As a short, young teacher, it helped distinguish me from students. In my first couple years at South, the cafeteria workers thought I was a student and would charge me the student lunch rate until I corrected them.”Merle was taken aback when he realized he had the ability to grow a beard and continues to sport one for his own personal pleasure.“For most of my twenties, I wasn’t able to grow a full beard; it was really spotty,” Merle said. “I stopped shaving during Spring break two years ago, and much to my surprise, it looked pretty full. So I decided to keep it for a while. I haven’t shaved since.”For Knoedler, the beard is a relatively new addition to his look. He did enjoy how it looked on him when he grew it out two months ago, but outside influence from a significant other was involved in his decision to stop shaving.“[I’ve had my beard] since February break. I didn’t shave over vacation, then just decided to keep it when my wife mentioned she liked it,” Knoedler said. “How can I shave it after that?”There are discrepancies over the net effects of the beard on the wearer of the beard and those experiencing it from afar. Some believe a beard can only have a positive impact on one’s character.“There are only advantages to having a beard,” Merle said, although he did not specify what those advantages are.In contrast, others will have problems with their facial hair from time to time.“If it gets long, it can get kind of itchy,” Kraus said.Although Merle’s family would rather see his chin bare and hairless, his friends find his beard amusing and appropriate considering the steryotypic image of a bearded professor.“My family hates [my facial hair] with a passion,” Merle said. “My friends seem to find it quite fitting, considering my professorial occupation.”Knoedler’s son objects to his beard, but Knoedler himself is largely a fan of it and feels that it augments his already good looks.“My son complains it pokes him when I kiss him,” Knoedler said. “[However] I think I’m incredibly handsome. My beard really pushes my handsomeness over the top. My friends are all very jealous.”Beards definitely evoke a myriad of reactions amongst the ladies. South girls in general seem to have reservations about beards, preferring that guys shave or at most leave their beards modest and well kept.“Honestly, I like the clean shaven look best, but some guys can really rock the beards,” freshman Sophie Cash said.“I don’t mind beards, but only if they are short and neat,” sophomore Gil Blume said. “[But] once it goes lumberjack-long, it’s time to shave. Mr. Merle has the perfect type of beard. Just putting it out there” Blume said.One student, when comparing her father’s facial hair perceptions living in the Northern region versus the Southern region of the United States, believes opinions regarding beards are regionally developed.“When my dad came up here from down South, he said it was harder to get a job up North with a beard,” freshman Leah Jacobson said. “Up here, large beards mean creepy.” Still, unique and original beards are appreciated.“I mostly like facial hair when it’s entertaining or weird, but not really for attractiveness’ sake,” Cash said.Freshman Natalie Silverman has a strong opinion about who should and shouldn’t have beards. She believes facial hair on South students doesn’t make the cut.“I think that facial hair on students is gross,” Silverman said. “I mean, we’re still kids, kind of, and it’s just weird seeing a fifteen year old with a full beard and mustache. ”Even Silverman, though, will admit that the right type of facial hair on the right type of person can look attractive.“With more mature and older men, beards and mustaches can look good. Not like a lumberjack-man kind of facial hair, but something subtle.”Silverman shares a similar opinion with many others about the pros and cons of facial hair. She too is quick to highlight its benefits. Both in and outside of the South community, beards are definitely in style.“Someone like Adam Levine or Joe Jonas,” Silverman said. “That look is, well… sexy.”

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Faculty Focus: Jack Rossini http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/03/23/faculty-focus-jack-rossini/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/03/23/faculty-focus-jack-rossini/#comments Wed, 23 Mar 2011 04:44:04 +0000 Courtney Foster http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5602 Throughout the course of the past half century, students created dynamic artwork and belted harmonious numbers within South’s walls.

The progression of the Art and Music programs at South has occurred in lieu of the efforts of countless people, from the parents who assist these programs to the teachers who build their foundations, and finally to the students who push these programs beyond their limits.

From within this sort of family, there is one man in particular who has seen these programs at their heights and struggles. This artist and musician is Dr. Jack Rossini, a teacher who recently re-introduced himself to the South community.

Rossini has a vast history in the Newton Public School system. His career at South began in 1983 when he directed the band, working with Choral Director Helen Taylor and Orchestra Director Gordon Duckel. This was not, however, an opportune time to start teaching at a new school.

During the 1980s, the student population in Newton began to fall increasingly lower. There came to be fewer and fewer students at South, until only several hundred spanned all the grade levels.

All student groups at South grew smaller; the school-wide band had only 25 musicians.

This decline in students led to the schools not needing as many teachers to maintain a proper student-teacher ratio, so Rossini’s first tenure ended during a series of staff cuts.

Around 1990, he taught at Brown Middle School.

According to Rossini, this was a tough time for everyone involved in the Newton Public School system, and consequently, everybody suffered.

Fortunately, the 1990’s brought a “building decade,” and the student population began to increase once more. When Newton South offered Rossini the position of orchestra director, he took the job, and what began as an 11-musician orchestra in 2003 grew to a hearty 45 musicians within six years.

The band and chorus increased in numbers as well with the arrival of Ms. Lisa Linde and Dr. Benjamin Youngman.

Beginning in 2006, Rossini headed the Fine Arts department until his retirement in 2009.

With Youngman’s leave of absence to travel  to China, Rossini returned to assume Youngman’s position as the director of three choruses and as the teacher of music theory classes.

During the time in which Rossini worked at South, much has changed in the Fine Arts department. Changes in student population have largely shaped and defined the progression of the Art and Music programs.

Currently, both of these programs are grappling with the effects of limited funding, and employees are working harder than ever to accommodate for the monetary losses.

Though art and music classes continue to increase in size, Rossini believes, “the student enthusiasm is still there” and are “on the upswing.”

Numerous awards have recognized the excellence of these programs, which is always showcased in the students’ high level of performance.

These artists have Rossini to thank for helping sculpt this inspirational pathway, which will provoke creativity in young minds for generations to come.

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Sounds of Newton Singers echo through halls after hours http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/12/06/sounds-of-newton-singers-echo-through-halls-after-hours/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/12/06/sounds-of-newton-singers-echo-through-halls-after-hours/#comments Mon, 06 Dec 2010 07:00:10 +0000 Courtney Foster http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5166 What happens when you take a bunch of adults who love to sing, a variety of intriguing musical scores, and everyone’s favorite choral director, Mr. Youngman’€and mix them all together? The Newton Singers.
The group meets once a week from 7:15 to 8:45 on Tuesdays in the chorus room. Their concert will be on the first Tuesday in June at South, and it’s open to the public.
Despite balancing busy lives, many adults still find time to sing in the Newton Singers.
Judy Pava, a soprano and a teacher at Brown Middle School, was first involved in the choir nine years ago, but had to stop participating for a while due to conflicts in her schedule. She decided to rejoin when her son, Max, was a South student.
“Max enjoyed working with Ben [Youngman] and the whole camaraderie, Pava said. “This pushed me to join again.
Youngman notes that situations such as this are not uncommon amongst members of the choir.
“The chorus is comprised of professionals, some retired…this ain’t their first rodeo. Many are parents of South students or alumni.
Pava also joined the choir in hopes of augmenting her musical skills and knowledge.
“I have sung, Pava said. “But mostly show music and not much choral music. I also wanted to get back to sight reading. She added, “It’s kind of a use-it-or-lose-it thing, and I guess I lost it.
She has been more than satisfied with the musical experience the group has offered. “I love the music selection and variety, especially the madrigal pieces and those which are more obscure, Pava said.
Though many adults joined simply for a chance to sing, the group has offered them something much deeper: a sense of community.
Jane, for example, a retiree of six years, decided to join the choir because she “loves to sing, but she soon grew to appreciate the members and atmosphere of the group as well.
“I like meeting the people, and I like the director, she said. “We get along well¦we laugh every week.
Pava agreed. “I love Youngman; that’s probably the number one reason why I like it here, she said.
“It’s a very warm, friendly environment, and a lot of fun, Pava said. “I wasn’t specifically coming looking for a lot of fun¦but it’s a lot of fun!
The director shares the same sentiments.
“They are a very kind and spirited group, Youngman said.
This dynamic is fueled by the fact that every participant in the group is there for a similar reason, so working with each other to achieve harmony is not difficult.
“Everybody is here to work on music, to dissect it, Pava said. “Everyone works together collaboratively, and is here for their love of music, to sing.
“They come together to explore music and their voices, Youngman said. “They try very hard.
The effort that the many adults of the Newton Singers put forth has been essential to the group’s success and growth.
Amidst the darkness of the night outdoors, the chorus room remains lit each Tuesday night as the Newton Singers learn, proving that South fosters education even after students are long gone.
“It’s amazing all the different backgrounds, Jane said.
“Some singers are from Newton, some from other places. Still, we’re all connected by the common alley of loving to sing.
“It goes to show, Youngman said, “that no matter who you are or what you do, music can still inspire and enlighten your life.

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Under the radar, the speech and debate team overachieves http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/11/02/under-the-radar-the-speech-and-debate-team-overachieves/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/11/02/under-the-radar-the-speech-and-debate-team-overachieves/#comments Tue, 02 Nov 2010 06:25:20 +0000 Courtney Foster http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5008 Even the least athletic students at South are well informed about the records of our sports teams.
A person wondering how our Girls’ Volleyball team is doing this season would quickly be told that they made it to the playoffs.
Why are there suddenly so many boys mimicking Eminem’s platinum- blond dyed hair? That, as anyone could tell you, is an annual cross-country team spirit tradition.
However, there is one competitive team at South, arguably the most successful, that is hardly talked about. That is the Speech and Debate team.
The Speech team has sent at least one student to the national speech finals for eleven consecutive years and was the state champion team in both 2008 and 2009.
Though this season has just begun, the team is already starting out strong, placing second at the Dighton-Rehoboth tournament, the first real tournament of the year.
Sophomore Holly Higgins won first place in the Declamation event, as did senior Justin Kieran in varsity Extemporaneous speaking. Among the second place winners were senior Nahuel Fefer and freshman Alex Verbitsky in Public Forum Debate, senior Harry Neff in Dramatic Performance, and junior Jackie Lebovits in Poetry Reading. Eight other individuals and pairs received awards as well.
Though many students have heard of the Speech team, some do not know anything at all about speech or what people do there.
In fact, speech is a complicated activity to describe concisely due to its many components. Even the most distinguished and experienced “speechies still have some trouble explaining how the speech team works.
“The Speech and Debate team competes against other schools in ‘Ëœpublic speaking’ events’€but this is a loaded term, team captain Neff said.
“We read poetry, we debate the implications of world news, we make stuff up…speech and debate covers every imaginable form of formalized verbal communication.
Still, one must be committed and willing to set aside some time outside of school to perfect the type of speaking required for a specific competitive event, some of which are memorized, some of which aren’t, and use the pieces to compete.
“We have local tournaments on Saturdays, senior and captain Melanie Rucinski said. “Those of us who don’t do [Extemporaneous events] or Debate prepare pieces for one or two.
The Speech team is comprised of many extremely talented students. As Rucinski notes, it “is basically a combination of future writers, senators, and actors.
It is also believed that being part of the team will often lead students to success later on in live.
“No matter what type of ‘Ëœspeaking’ one does on the speech team, she will glean invaluable skill and experience from it, Neff said.
Though it’s always gratifying to leave a tournament with an award, members of the Speech team do not defining winning simply in terms of coming home with something shiny and metallic in their hands.
“The best thing about Speech team is that it teaches us to feel the best when we get lots of feedback about our performance, instead of only feeling good if we win, Rucinski said.
Whereas one must have good hand-eye coordination to play volleyball or strong legs to run cross-country, even a person with no athletic ability can be on Speech and still say that he or she is on a competitive team.
Not only is the club also easy to be a part of due to flexibility in participation, but it also also offers life skills.
“Public speaking is the number one fear among American adults, and experience in it, in any form, is a distinguished life skill, Neff said. “It can’t hurt.

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Students reflect on the transitions between each grade http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/10/28/students-reflect-on-the-transitions-between-each-grade/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/10/28/students-reflect-on-the-transitions-between-each-grade/#comments Thu, 28 Oct 2010 06:09:11 +0000 Courtney Foster http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=4849 As a relaxing summer comes to a close, just hearing the words “back to school will turn any sun-kissed teen into a nervous wreck.
Why? Whether it be a stressed freshman or an eager senior, the transition from one grade to another is tough for all students. Over a course of only four years, each year of high school is dramatically different from the previous one.
Freshmen generally have the most trouble settling into school because there is very little continuity between eighth and ninth grade.
The transition tends to hit new high school students like a smack in the face, whether it be through the ridiculously early morning hassle, the seemingly interminable trek from class to class, or the significantly increased workload. New freshman were amazed by the differences.
“The year started off a lot faster, freshman Jarrett Gorin said.
Freshman Mel Gundersheim already likes high school more than middle school.
“Socially, there are a lot more chances to be yourself and not care what people think, she said.
Gundersheim also pointed out that  freshmen must adjust to having more classes and more schoolwork.
Despite the negative aspects of the more work, Gundersheim finds that there are also benefits.
“With more work you have more responsibility, which makes you feel older and more independent, she said.
The transition between eigth and ninth grade is significant, but it seems as though the pace is increased further as students enter tenth grade.
“There is less focus on being social, and more on schoolwork, sophomore Sarah Clemente said.  “But you do notice people in other grades more.
Still, some sophomores have regrets about moving on from freshman year.
“In sophomore year, who you are is already set in stone. It’s harder to branch out, whereas freshman year nobody really knows you yet, sophomore Sarah Rabinowitz said.
“I liked being the youngest, sophomore Abby Coleman said.
However, Coleman finds that some elements of freshman year remain even when one is a sophomore, including an unfamiliarity with the location of her classes.
Although heightened authority and off-campus privileges are a plus, school’s intensity ramps up in junior year, notorious for being the busiest in all four years of high school.
“Junior year is definitely a lot harder, junior Sarah Sugarman said.  “There is a lot more work and the pressure of knowing that this year really matters.
Something else intimidating also comes into the scene: college. According to Sugarman, her classmates are especially concerned with their SATs.
Once students make it through junior year, they are on the home stretch of high school–rather the homecoming stretch.
Still, senior year presents some challenges that are not anticipated.
“Most people think of senior year as being really easy, but at least right now it is actually academically harder to adjust to than other year, senior Shayna Camiel said.
Camiel noted that, in addition to an increase in course workload and difficulty, as a senior “you also have to do a lot of work for colleges.
College is a major topic of discussion. While suffering through the application process, college is always on seniors’ minds, which is something that really defines the beginning of the year.
“All that’s ever talked about is college, senior Jenny Gerstner said.  “That’s all you end up talking about, no matter where the conversation starts. People are more secretive and defensive and get strange about it.
Though there is pride that comes from becoming the oldest in the school, this seniority does have its downsides.
“I realized I didn’t know anyone in the school anymore besides people in my grade, senior Chloe Milliman said.  “I feel less connected to the underclassmen.
However, for many seniors, there is hope that their quality of life will improve as the year progresses.
“I think senior year will get more happy and exciting once the year goes on, Milliman said.  “Once we’re all accepted into college people will relax. Everyone is overly anxious right now.
It is clear that transitions from one grade to another are no small matter.
Nevertheless, students all count on what keeps them going each day to make it through high school: our sports, clubs, activities, friends –whatever keeps us cheerful and content.
Change is difficult to adapt to but it does not last forever. We just wait it out, and then another year goes by.

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Drastic new hairstyles turn students into hairless heroes http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/09/30/drastic-new-hairstyles-turn-students-into-hairless-heroes/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/09/30/drastic-new-hairstyles-turn-students-into-hairless-heroes/#comments Thu, 30 Sep 2010 06:02:51 +0000 Courtney Foster http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=4666 Imagine being able to turn heads just by walking down the hallway between classes.
Come the first day of school, several students have done just that. Their secret? Showing off a new, drastic haircut, and in some cases, even a shaved head.
Several South students have had positive personal responses to their recently acquired lack of hair.
“Having short hair has kind of made me feel more edgy and encouraged me to try out new looks, junior Mickie Gusman said.
“I shaved my head partly because it was hot out. The feeling right after was so nice¦it was really soft and smooth, senior Satchel Forrester said.
Others, such as senior Zach Levine-Caleb, claim that their new cut has complimented their persona.
“I woke up one morning and my hair was gone. With my short hair, I am more aerodynamic and ‘Ëœaquadynamic’¦I’m more dynamic in general, Levine-Caleb said.
However, with the satisfaction that comes from getting a drastic haircut, there are subsequent regrets as well.
Gusman explains that her short hair “has also been pretty restricting. I wish I could do some more fun things with it, like braid it or something, but there isn’t much you can do with a length of just a few inches.
Senior Connie Gong took getting a drastic haircut to a new level this summer when she spontaneously decided to shave her head.
“I just felt like I was in the mood for drastic change¦I don’t think I was all that nervous before, probably because I didn’t think it through hard enough, Gong said.
“After, I was alternating between feeling extremely liberated and extremely terrified because I suddenly realized how conspicuous it was and I don’t really like to be the center of attention.
Unlike their own reactions to their haircuts, other people’s reactions to these students’ new  dos have been rather mixed
Although Gong was initially nervous to see how people would react, she says that she has not personally gotten any negative feedback.
“The number one reaction I’ve gotten is people coming up to me and asking why I did it, which I don’t have a great answer to, Gong said.
“I think a lot of people are incredulous when I tell them I just felt like it.  A lot of people wanted to touch my head¦now that it’s growing out its really soft and fluffy.
“At first, when my hair was really short, my friends were kind of unsure of how to react, Gusman said.
“They kind of just stared at me until they recognized who I was at first, then made some joke or asked some questions. When it grew in some more, people generally reacted in a more positive way which I really appreciated.
Levine-Caleb reports that he has received some outright negative reactions to his haircut, but he doesn’t let these comments get to his head, so to speak.
“At first people didn’t even acknowledge my new haircut because I was so aerodynamic that they couldn’t even see me when I went by them. Now people generally say it looks horrible, but I don’t care, Levine-Caleb said.
The most surprising part about these hairless heroes is that some say their haircuts really don’t mean anything about who they are as people.
In fact, Gong says that her haircut actually reflects the opposite of her true personality.
“I’m really not rebellious or bold or any of the other things people usually associated with having a shaved head. I’d sort of rather people not pay attention at all, but I probably should have thought of that before I did this, Gong said.
In contrast, others say that their haircuts are extremely representative of who they are.“The haircut is basically a statement that I don’t care, Levine-Caleb said.
Others, such as freshman Sara Wang, have shaved their heads for charity.
Wang shaved her head last spring for Brown Baldies, an event in which Brown Middle School students pay one dollar to watch their teachers and fellow classmates get their heads shaved.
The proceeds are donated to help people with cancer.
This really shows how much a person is willing to give back to help other people– even if it means going bald– and is representative of each Baldie’s character.
Will other people follow the trend and get dramatic haircuts as well?
Will we be seeing more bald people in the halls?
Only time will tell.

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