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Denebola » Craig Fujita http://www.denebolaonline.net The Award-Winning, Official School Newspaper of Newton South High School, Newton, MA Fri, 17 Jun 2011 02:00:19 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.2 FAR FROM HOME http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/far-from-home/ http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/15/far-from-home/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2011 05:07:08 +0000 Craig Fujita http://www.denebolaonline.net/?p=5789 Editor’s Note: This article was based on a conversation with Mr Fujita, a former at Brookline High student and currently a local  Apple Store trainer.
It must have been the day of the earthquake, and it was all over the news and I was at the Apple store.
Between my wife and I, one of us was always plugged into the news. We heard about the earthquake, and then waited for the wave.
No one was prepared, in any way, for a wave of this size.
I was completely unaware. What really impacted me were the first images and the actual video of the tsunami coming into the coast of Sendai.
It was unbelievable in the sense of its mass, its obvious power.
People were making references to Hollywood movies and their special effects.
A wave that tremendous, that out of scale, was so far removed from what we had seen or heard in real life.
The power plants were not on my mind.
The first problem was: can we communicate? Are the phones working, can people reply to emails?
It took a while to appreciate that other danger.
My grandfather in California was in touch, my wife finally got a very short text from her brother- everything was OK.
[There was] panic, because [officials] didn’t think they could control it- a lot of “if,” still plenty of “if” though now we seem further away from a serious melt down.
Radiation is coming out but but the levels, beyond the plant, are not as dangerous as first imagined. [Officials] say they are within normal “background” levels of radiation at a distance- something like the equivalent of a CT scan.
We talked about Chernobyl at Brookline High School. We all had awareness; we’re not that far away from Three Mile Island.
I learned about the importance of power but I did not learn about the direct effects … we knew about radiation- it’s pretty nasty stuff.
But in Japan, Tokyo if you’ve been there, you can see the lights, you can see the power being used.
Why haven’t we collaborated in finding better sources of energy?
It highlights the point that our priorities are mixed up, at least globally.
The problem in Japan wasn’t due to a war, it was a natural disaster combined with an insecure plant.
There’s considerable blame now, [because people feel] someone has to take responsibility.
There’s not enough responsible information.
Japanese people have to get their accurate information about the energy crisis, comprised nuclear power stations, data about the reactors, emergency cooling, the dumping of radioactive gasses or water.  Important, long-term issues, have not been discussed.
Young people in Japan? Scared.
Many now realize all this could happen again.
Not  the natural disaster, but nuclear power, how dangerous it can be and how crucial [it is that] all the complicated elements be monitored much more carefully and made more public.
It brings an instability people didn’t realize before.
Perhaps not so much instability as a sense that someone was watching over, taking care as much as possible.   We are all trying to get over the little fears … that the air, the food we eat and water we drink could kill us, if not now, in the future.
All said if I could go back to Japan, I would go again this year.

Editor’s Note: This article was based on a conversation with Mr Fujita, a former at Brookline High student and currently a local  Apple Store trainer.It must have been the day of the earthquake, and it was all over the news and I was at the Apple store. Between my wife and I, one of us was always plugged into the news. We heard about the earthquake, and then waited for the wave.No one was prepared, in any way, for a wave of this size.I was completely unaware. What really impacted me were the first images and the actual video of the tsunami coming into the coast of Sendai.It was unbelievable in the sense of its mass, its obvious power.People were making references to Hollywood movies and their special effects. A wave that tremendous, that out of scale, was so far removed from what we had seen or heard in real life.The power plants were not on my mind.The first problem was: can we communicate? Are the phones working, can people reply to emails?It took a while to appreciate that other danger.My grandfather in California was in touch, my wife finally got a very short text from her brother- everything was OK.[There was] panic, because [officials] didn’t think they could control it- a lot of “if,” still plenty of “if” though now we seem further away from a serious melt down.Radiation is coming out but but the levels, beyond the plant, are not as dangerous as first imagined. [Officials] say they are within normal “background” levels of radiation at a distance- something like the equivalent of a CT scan.We talked about Chernobyl at Brookline High School. We all had awareness; we’re not that far away from Three Mile Island.I learned about the importance of power but I did not learn about the direct effects … we knew about radiation- it’s pretty nasty stuff.But in Japan, Tokyo if you’ve been there, you can see the lights, you can see the power being used.Why haven’t we collaborated in finding better sources of energy? It highlights the point that our priorities are mixed up, at least globally.The problem in Japan wasn’t due to a war, it was a natural disaster combined with an insecure plant.There’s considerable blame now, [because people feel] someone has to take responsibility.There’s not enough responsible information. Japanese people have to get their accurate information about the energy crisis, comprised nuclear power stations, data about the reactors, emergency cooling, the dumping of radioactive gasses or water.  Important, long-term issues, have not been discussed.Young people in Japan? Scared.Many now realize all this could happen again. Not  the natural disaster, but nuclear power, how dangerous it can be and how crucial [it is that] all the complicated elements be monitored much more carefully and made more public.It brings an instability people didn’t realize before.Perhaps not so much instability as a sense that someone was watching over, taking care as much as possible.   We are all trying to get over the little fears … that the air, the food we eat and water we drink could kill us, if not now, in the future.All said if I could go back to Japan, I would go again this year.

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