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Editorials and Opinions

Opposing Viewpoints

By Ilana Sivachenko and Rutul Patel
Published: April 2011

The new ice cream in the cafeteria is…

Pro

…delicious and necessary.

Usually I order sushi or go out during my free lunch block; occasionally I bring a sandwich from home, but last Wednesday was different…
As I walked toward the cafeteria, I saw a freshman holding a delicious, ice cream cone.
My mind was reeling from the shock. How could a 15 year-old be holding an ice cream cone in the hallway? Did his mother drop it off? Where did this mysterious and delectable snack come from?
I decided to put my top-notch investigative skills to work, but first I wanted to grab something for lunch. As I walked through the cafeteria door, I found myself surrounded by ice cream cones, and for once, I wasn’t hallucinating.
People were really holding ice cream cones!
I consider myself an epicurean, a go hard or go home fan of fine food so my journey to find a cold ice cream cone quickly turned into a contact sport.
I pushed my way through a horde of underclassmen to find the hub of the entire operation, a cooler filled to the brim with tasty frozen snacks.
After purchasing an ice cream cone, I was met with a number of disapproving stares.
Some people may say that ice cream is bad for your teeth, or that it is bad for your health. In fact, a food that contains milk as opposed to excess sugar, like Sour Patch Kids, is preferable any day of the week. In addition to this, there is also a positive psychological aspect: people love ice cream!
In fact, the average American eats 23.2 quarts of ice cream and other frozen dairy products each year. Scientists working with ice cream don’t try to remove the sugar or the calorie count, instead, they merely try to add nutritional value.
Ice cream is far from unhealthy, in fact a bowl of ice cream has less calories than your favorite soda, compare 200 calories per serving to ice cream’s mere 40.
To all the haters that nay-say sorbet, ice cream is healthier than many of the other products in our cafeteria.
The majority of ice cream on the market is made from natural sugar and milk, but it’s also important to remember that 60% of an ice cream cone is still water.
Every food, from meat to spinach, can have an undesired effect on your body.
Adding ice cream to the menu is certainly not the most damaging decision Newton South High School will ever make, and if it brightens the days of our students, I’d say it’s worth a few extra calories.
Complaining about ice cream when there are so many scholastic and social issues that need to be solved is both counterproductive and silly.
Ice cream cones are delicious, cold, refreshing, creamy and crunchy, and most importantly, sweet, and if there is one thing a Newton South student needs on a daily basis it is a healthy mixture of sugar and caffeine.

sually I order sushi or go out during my free lunch block; occasionally I bring a sandwich from home, but last Wednesday was different…As I walked toward the cafeteria, I saw a freshman holding a delicious, ice cream cone.My mind was reeling from the shock. How could a 15 year-old be holding an ice cream cone in the hallway? Did his mother drop it off? Where did this mysterious and delectable snack come from?I decided to put my top-notch investigative skills to work, but first I wanted to grab something for lunch. As I walked through the cafeteria door, I found myself surrounded by ice cream cones, and for once, I wasn’t hallucinating. People were really holding ice cream cones!I consider myself an epicurean, a go hard or go home fan of fine food so my journey to find a cold ice cream cone quickly turned into a contact sport. I pushed my way through a horde of underclassmen to find the hub of the entire operation, a cooler filled to the brim with tasty frozen snacks.After purchasing an ice cream cone, I was met with a number of disapproving stares. Some people may say that ice cream is bad for your teeth, or that it is bad for your health. In fact, a food that contains milk as opposed to excess sugar, like Sour Patch Kids, is preferable any day of the week. In addition to this, there is also a positive psychological aspect: people love ice cream! In fact, the average American eats 23.2 quarts of ice cream and other frozen dairy products each year. Scientists working with ice cream don’t try to remove the sugar or the calorie count, instead, they merely try to add nutritional value.Ice cream is far from unhealthy, in fact a bowl of ice cream has less calories than your favorite soda, compare 200 calories per serving to ice cream’s mere 40. To all the haters that nay-say sorbet, ice cream is healthier than many of the other products in our cafeteria. The majority of ice cream on the market is made from natural sugar and milk, but it’s also important to remember that 60% of an ice cream cone is still water.Every food, from meat to spinach, can have an undesired effect on your body. Adding ice cream to the menu is certainly not the most damaging decision Newton South High School will ever make, and if it brightens the days of our students, I’d say it’s worth a few extra calories.Complaining about ice cream when there are so many scholastic and social issues that need to be solved is both counterproductive and silly. Ice cream cones are delicious, cold, refreshing, creamy and crunchy, and most importantly, sweet, and if there is one thing a Newton South student needs on a daily basis it is a healthy mixture of sugar and caffeine.\

Con

…unhealthy and excessive.

I scream. You scream. We all scream for…

Ice cream. Duh. Reading that pro over there, you probably have your wallet out ready to buy some delicious Choc-Tacos or frozen Twix bars.

But wait! Something is amiss in this picture. Imagine yourself walking into the cafeteria. All you see are posters asking you if you got milk, (we’re not cows; we don’t carry milk on us) and telling you to live healthy. So why would a cafeteria that is so fond of promoting healthy eating sell ice cream?

Maybe it’s because they realized that most of the good food is gone by the time the majority of the students go to get their lunch.

Or maybe out of the goodness of their hearts they wanted to give us some delicious goodies to eat for dessert after we have our lunch. (A pretty pricy desert might I add. Someone should mention that $2.00 for a Klondike Bar is pushing it.  But then again some people may do that for a Klondike Bar.) Or it could be that the cafeteria wants to make more money.

You have to know your demographic. If you were in a retirement home, prune juice would be the way to go. If you were selling stuff in New Jersey, then you’d need a truck filled with hair gel and spray tan. As the kids in the entrepreneurship class would say, its basic business.

Don’t get me wrong, I have no problem with making money—capitalism all the way, otherwise the commies win. But the problem with selling ice cream in school is that you’re selling ice cream in school. What happened to healthy living?

Ice cream gets 48% of its calories from fat. And even the low fat alternative has 25% calories from fat. Giving kids that have a wallet filled with cash a virtually endless supply of ice cream is like giving Charlie Sheen the keys to Colombia’s cocaine factories.

As many of you know Charlie appreciates it, but it’s just not good for him.

There’s a reason that America is leading the world in childhood obesity. We refuse to moderate our needs.

If you eat one bar of ice cream every week, then you’d be all right. You would relish the treat while you have it, and you’d eventually work it off.

But if you had a virtually endless supply of ice cream, then guess who would gain 40 pounds and start taking the elevator instead of the stairs?

All I’m saying is that the cafeteria is hypocritical for have a slushie machine and a giant tub filled with ice cream surrounded by health posters.

If you wanted to keep kids healthy then ice cream wasn’t the best way to go. Also, the greasy food might not be the most clever way to promote good health, either. But that’s a rant for another time.

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