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Prometheus Bound holds South’s student audience captive

Posted By Sarah Wanger On April 14, 2011 @ 11:56 pm In Arts and Entertainment | Comments Disabled

Prometheus Bound is a rock musical based off the Greek tragedy written by Aeschylus carrying the same name.
The plot follows the story of Prometheus, the Titan condemned to torture after he disobeys Zeus and gives humans fire.
Many gods come to see him, to tell him of his fate and his eternity, but Prometheus stands strong and takes the pain, knowing that his suffering will end when the time is right.
The Oberon, the theater producing the show, is owned by the American Repertory Theater, and when you enter the theater, it is known right off that this is not a typical play.
There are no seats (unless you want to spend an extra $20-$30), and no defined stage.
The actors, in full costume, walk into the room from backstage and converse with the crowd. As the crowd  hums “Break a leg!” and “Enjoy the show!” the lights fade as silence sweeps over the crowd.
The lights open up on the actors, now in a line in front of the band.
A call from the lead actor, the actors spin into view, revealing that they are blindfolded. With nooses tied around their necks and drums puncturing the silent crowd, the show begins.
Many people have asked me why I have spent so much money to see this show multiple times.
Honestly, it’s the energy that the actors bring to the stage, this electric pulse that is felt by every pore in my body.
The set is atypical, as “groupies” gently, but firmly push you out of the way of the moving platforms and ladders, constantly spinning to follow the action. There is never a dull moment: wherever you look, actors are completely immersed in the world of Prometheus Bound.
The title role of Prometheus is played by none other than a two time-Tony nominated Best Actor, Gavin Creel.
The tortured, strong-willed Prometheus is already a tough part to pull off, especially while switching from ballads to rock tunes in five minutes.  And on top of that, when I spoke to him at the end of the show, he said he wasn’t feeling well.
Personally, I don’t think many could have sounded as good as him when they were fully healthy, let alone with a cough and a cold.
Lo, a women who sparks Zeus’ lust by her beauty, is played by Uzo Aduba.
She has the first solo of the night, and her passion and grace set the mood for the rest of the show.
Her pain and suffering at the hands of Zeus is almost palpable, especially as she recounts the tale of being chased out of her home to please the gods, and sleeping with the most powerful god of all.
Force, played by Lea Delaria, is a demi-god, who assists in Zeus’ torture of Prometheus. Zeus does not appear in this play, so Force takes the reins as the person to carry out Zeus’ dreadful orders. Her voice is a powerhouse of awesome force, making her character’s name an appropriate one, and her evil laugh sends chills.
Michael Cunio plays the role of Oceanos, another Titan, but one who does not disobey Zeus. He tries to get Prometheus to stop speaking out against Zeus in return for his freedom, but to no avail.
Cunio’s rock-star voice leads one to believe he belongs singing his heart out in a rock band, which is exactly what he does when he’s not performing in theater. His band, Reckless Place, has an album out on iTunes.
The funniest character in the show, judging by the audience’s reaction, is the role of Hermes, played by Gabe Ebert.
His Hermes is exactly like Hermes should be: a young god trying to gloat over his power, when in fact, he is just too young to understand anyone other than those above him.
He plays up the jokes at appropriate times, and brings intensified energy to the potentially boring ending – after all, an audience that’s been standing for an hour and a half  is looking for excitement.
An unconventional fact about Prometheus Bound is that it is partnered with Amnesty International,  an organization that gives voice to people who cannot give voices to themselves, and tries to help unjust imprisonment and death penalties.
Each week, the cast dedicates their show to a different person who had been “bound” for speaking out.
Directly after the show, walks into the audience to pass out postcards urging audience members to sign them and put them in a box for Amnesty International to send to the government in question. There could be no better show to work towards such a goal as freeing those bound than this one.
By 11:30pm on Saturday, April 2nd, I will have seen this show four times. Every cent spent was worth it. Rumors are spreading about the show going to New York, and I could not be more thrilled.
Never before, have I seen a show where you are so emerged in the action, and where actors feed off of the audience.
I cannot wait to see this cast up on the Tony stage singing with all of the heart and soul they have on stage every other night that I have seen them. I hope the Tony; they deserve it.

By Sarah WangerPrometheus Bound is a rock musical based off the Greek tragedy written by Aeschylus carrying the same name. The plot follows the story of Prometheus, the Titan condemned to torture after he disobeys Zeus and gives humans fire.Many gods come to see him, to tell him of his fate and his eternity, but Prometheus stands strong and takes the pain, knowing that his suffering will end when the time is right.The Oberon, the theater producing the show, is owned by the American Repertory Theater, and when you enter the theater, it is known right off that this is not a typical play.There are no seats (unless you want to spend an extra $20-$30), and no defined stage.  The actors, in full costume, walk into the room from backstage and converse with the crowd. As the crowd  hums “Break a leg!” and “Enjoy the show!” the lights fade as silence sweeps over the crowd.The lights open up on the actors, now in a line in front of the band. A call from the lead actor, the actors spin into view, revealing that they are blindfolded. With nooses tied around their necks and drums puncturing the silent crowd, the show begins. Many people have asked me why I have spent so much money to see this show multiple times. Honestly, it’s the energy that the actors bring to the stage, this electric pulse that is felt by every pore in my body.The set is atypical, as “groupies” gently, but firmly push you out of the way of the moving platforms and ladders, constantly spinning to follow the action. There is never a dull moment: wherever you look, actors are completely immersed in the world of Prometheus Bound. The title role of Prometheus is played by none other than a two time-Tony nominated Best Actor, Gavin Creel.The tortured, strong-willed Prometheus is already a tough part to pull off, especially while switching from ballads to rock tunes in five minutes.  And on top of that, when I spoke to him at the end of the show, he said he wasn’t feeling well.Personally, I don’t think many could have sounded as good as him when they were fully healthy, let alone with a cough and a cold. Lo, a women who sparks Zeus’ lust by her beauty, is played by Uzo Aduba. She has the first solo of the night, and her passion and grace set the mood for the rest of the show.Her pain and suffering at the hands of Zeus is almost palpable, especially as she recounts the tale of being chased out of her home to please the gods, and sleeping with the most powerful god of all. Force, played by Lea Delaria, is a demi-god, who assists in Zeus’ torture of Prometheus. Zeus does not appear in this play, so Force takes the reins as the person to carry out Zeus’ dreadful orders. Her voice is a powerhouse of awesome force, making her character’s name an appropriate one, and her evil laugh sends chills. Michael Cunio plays the role of Oceanos, another Titan, but one who does not disobey Zeus. He tries to get Prometheus to stop speaking out against Zeus in return for his freedom, but to no avail.Cunio’s rock-star voice leads one to believe he belongs singing his heart out in a rock band, which is exactly what he does when he’s not performing in theater. His band, Reckless Place, has an album out on iTunes.The funniest character in the show, judging by the audience’s reaction, is the role of Hermes, played by Gabe Ebert.His Hermes is exactly like Hermes should be: a young god trying to gloat over his power, when in fact, he is just too young to understand anyone other than those above him.He plays up the jokes at appropriate times, and brings intensified energy to the potentially boring ending – after all, an audience that’s been standing for an hour and a half  is looking for excitement.An unconventional fact about Prometheus Bound is that it is partnered with Amnesty International,  an organization that gives voice to people who cannot give voices to themselves, and tries to help unjust imprisonment and death penalties.Each week, the cast dedicates their show to a different person who had been “bound” for speaking out.Directly after the show, walks into the audience to pass out postcards urging audience members to sign them and put them in a box for Amnesty International to send to the government in question. There could be no better show to work towards such a goal as freeing those bound than this one.By 11:30pm on Saturday, April 2nd, I will have seen this show four times. Every cent spent was worth it. Rumors are spreading about the show going to New York, and I could not be more thrilled.Never before, have I seen a show where you are so emerged in the action, and where actors feed off of the audience.I cannot wait to see this cast up on the Tony stage singing with all of the heart and soul they have on stage every other night that I have seen them. I hope the Tony; they deserve it.

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Article printed from Denebola: http://www.denebolaonline.net

URL to article: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/14/prometheus-bound-holds-south%e2%80%99s-student-audience-captive/

URLs in this post:

[1] So you think you can improv with the next top show?: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2009/10/21/so-you-think-you-can-improv-with-the-next-top-show/

[2] Art Focus: Justin Danforth: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2007/10/25/art-focus-justin-danforth/

[3] Behind the curtains at South Stage auditions: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2009/03/25/behind-the-curtains-at-south-stage-auditions/

[4] A spontaneous start for South Stage: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2007/10/25/a-spontaneous-start-for-south-stage/

[5] Freshmen light up South’s stage in Taking the Call: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2008/11/26/freshmen-light-up-south%e2%80%99s-stage-in-taking-the-call/

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