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Faculty Focus: Christopher Bender

Posted By Josh Nislick On April 14, 2011 @ 11:48 pm In Features | Comments Disabled

Fifteen years ago, you could see him entertaining fans on the basketball court.
Now, Christopher Bender watches over Newton South students as a campus aide.
Bender graduated from South in 1995, and in 2010 he accepted a job as a campus aide for the school.
When Bender was a South student, he enjoyed Math and English.
“My favorite teachers,” he said, “Were Ms. Scott, my sophomore Math teacher, Mr. White, my junior English teacher, and Ms. Wiener, my senior Spanish teacher.”
Today, Bender feels that South is similar to when he attended as a student, but he said that there were some significant differences.
“School is bigger,” Bender said. “When I was a student there was no field house, and the school ended at the 3000s.”
Not only is South physically different, but Bender feels that it has also developed academically and intellectually.
He noted that South offers more programs and courses than it did when he was a student.
“There’s more opportunity to succeed,” he said. “Without these programs, a lot of kids would fall through the cracks.”
What Bender likes the most about the “new” South is the improved facilities, as well as the increased amount of technology.
“When I went to South 90 percent of students were not on the internet,” he said, “And I remember watching a slide show with music in it, and it blew our minds.
“The school does a good job of being technologically advanced.”
As for the facilities, Bender is impressed with the way South has grown in that area.
“The weight room used to be the size of a closet,” he said, “And the fields are in much better shape.”
However not everything about the high school has changed for Bender.
“There are the exact same teachers as when I went here,” he said. “They still seem young but you find out they’ve been here for fifteen years.”
Coming back to South as an adult, Bender has a different perspective of South, and he views the school differently than he did in 1995.
“As a student it was all about getting into college,” Bender said. “College doesn’t even really affect your life. Just because you don’t go to the one you dream of, it’s not a big deal.”
Bender has a different perspective on college now, but he acknowledges that the burden colleges put on students has remained the same.
Although the pressure from universities can be stressful, Bender feels that South’s greatest strength is its ability to prepare students well for college, just as it did when he attended the high school.
“It’s providing a great education for people just like it did fifteen years ago,” Bender said, “Which I guess is the most important thing.”
Bender believes that another aspect of South that has remained constant is its feeling of togetherness.
“I think one of the strengths of South has always been its sense of community,” he said. “As you grow older you learn to value your friends, and students have pride in their school and those networks.”
Bender is content with South in 2011, but he does feel that the school is missing something.
“South used to have a Senior Show,” said Bender. “It was kind of a comedic spoof and it seemed like a lot fun. It would be a great experience for students now.”
Aside from the cancellation of this show, Bender is impressed with the range of instruction the high schools is providing for its students.
“South offers a very diverse education that you wouldn’t find at most other schools,” Bender said.

Fifteen years ago, you could see him entertaining fans on the basketball court. Now, Christopher Bender watches over Newton South students as a campus aide. Bender graduated from South in 1995, and in 2010 he accepted a job as a campus aide for the school. When Bender was a South student, he enjoyed Math and English. “My favorite teachers,” he said, “Were Ms. Scott, my sophomore Math teacher, Mr. White, my junior English teacher, and Ms. Wiener, my senior Spanish teacher.”Today, Bender feels that South is similar to when he attended as a student, but he said that there were some significant differences. “School is bigger,” Bender said. “When I was a student there was no field house, and the school ended at the 3000s.”Not only is South physically different, but Bender feels that it has also developed academically and intellectually. He noted that South offers more programs and courses than it did when he was a student. “There’s more opportunity to succeed,” he said. “Without these programs, a lot of kids would fall through the cracks.”What Bender likes the most about the “new” South is the improved facilities, as well as the increased amount of technology. “When I went to South 90 percent of students were not on the internet,” he said, “And I remember watching a slide show with music in it, and it blew our minds. “The school does a good job of being technologically advanced.”As for the facilities, Bender is impressed with the way South has grown in that area. “The weight room used to be the size of a closet,” he said, “And the fields are in much better shape.”However not everything about the high school has changed for Bender. “There are the exact same teachers as when I went here,” he said. “They still seem young but you find out they’ve been here for fifteen years.”Coming back to South as an adult, Bender has a different perspective of South, and he views the school differently than he did in 1995. “As a student it was all about getting into college,” Bender said. “College doesn’t even really affect your life. Just because you don’t go to the one you dream of, it’s not a big deal.” Bender has a different perspective on college now, but he acknowledges that the burden colleges put on students has remained the same.Although the pressure from universities can be stressful, Bender feels that South’s greatest strength is its ability to prepare students well for college, just as it did when he attended the high school. “It’s providing a great education for people just like it did fifteen years ago,” Bender said, “Which I guess is the most important thing.”Bender believes that another aspect of South that has remained constant is its feeling of togetherness. “I think one of the strengths of South has always been its sense of community,” he said. “As you grow older you learn to value your friends, and students have pride in their school and those networks.”Bender is content with South in 2011, but he does feel that the school is missing something. “South used to have a Senior Show,” said Bender. “It was kind of a comedic spoof and it seemed like a lot fun. It would be a great experience for students now.”Aside from the cancellation of this show, Bender is impressed with the range of instruction the high schools is providing for its students. “South offers a very diverse education that you wouldn’t find at most other schools,” Bender said.

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Article printed from Denebola: http://www.denebolaonline.net

URL to article: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2011/04/14/faculty-focus-christopher-bender/

URLs in this post:

[1] Faculty Focus: Hayley Teich: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2009/11/25/faculty-focus-hayley-teich/

[2] Faculty Focus: Kara Henry: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2008/03/19/faculty-focus-kara-henry/

[3] Faculty Focus (Meaghan McCormick): http://www.denebolaonline.net/2007/11/21/faculty-focus-meaghan-mccormick/

[4] Faculty Focus: Michael Kennedy: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2010/10/28/faculty-focus-michael-kennedy/

[5] Faculty Focus: Joanna Norton: http://www.denebolaonline.net/2007/12/19/faculty-focus-joanna-norton/

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