Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/denebolasandbox/denebola_2009/wp-includes/ms-load.php on line 113
Denebola » Article » FCD warns against addiction
Features

FCD warns against addiction

By Julia Lytle
Published: May 2009

As a response to events this year involving drug and alcohol abuse, the administration at Newton South brought speakers from an organization called Freedom from Chemical Dependency Educational Services to the school to speak about personal experiences with addiction to drugs and alcohol. 

FCD was founded in 1976 by Donald F. Cutler, with an initial goal of teaching the process of early intervention to families involved with alcoholics.

However, the focus has expanded to serving primarily young people, and FCD now offers a Four-Day Course, which is taught by highly trained educators who have a past of addiction to either drugs, alcohol, or both.
The teachers are able to share with their audience an honest, first-hand take on addiction, providing eye-opening stories from their pasts.

Now under the leadership of Alex J. Packer, Ph.D., an educator, psychologist and author, FCD has become the world’s leading nonprofit prevention service, providing seminars to students ranging from kindergarten through college.

In the past year alone, FCD has led on-site programs to nearly 400 schools, presenting to more than 65,000 students. FCD also provides services to schools in other countries, and since their start of operations in 1796, the organization has served over one million students in more than 25 countries.

FCD’s main goal in presenting to children and young adults is to provide the information and skills necessary to make healthy and intelligent decisions specifically regarding the use of drugs or alcohol.

Teachers from the FCD provide their audience with information on both the physiological and psychological effects of drugs and alcohol, as well as proper methods for intervention.

FCD also plays a part in helping school heads and administrators come up with and implement effective approaches to prevention in their schools.

Believing that prevention is more than a drug education course, an assembly, and a set of rules, FCD sees prevention and addiction as the positive or negative effects of the entire school community and climate.
A healthy school community is a combination of good values and morals, stable relationships, priorities, rules, and healthy activities.

A school community that will assist with prevention is defined by the FCD as one that is sympathetic to all of the risk factors that may affect a student’s susceptibility to addiction. These include stress levels, parent involvement, sense of belonging, and trust within the community.

The school, through administrative decisions, programs, and policies, must create a feeling of tolerance and acceptance, opportunities for positive relationships, and knowledge of drug-related issues in order to protect against addiction.

On Thursday, May 7 Newton South students had the opportunity to attend workshops and seminars provided by the FCD in the auditorium.

The speakers present were both former addicts, both having been addicted to alcohol as well as other drugs such as marijuana and cocaine.

One, a former Newton North student, told of his experience with alcohol and recreational drugs during high school and of the escalation of his use once he entered college. The other, a Vietnam veteran, told of his use of alcohol to cope with social maturation as well as fear while serving in the army.

The latter of the two also discussed his career as a cop after returning from the war and its association with his addiction, as fellow cops allowed him to go unpunished after drinking and driving and getting caught with illegal substances.

After discussing personal experiences, both mentors went on to discuss their concern for teenagers who are beginning more and more to show early signs of addiction. The first speaker shared his experience in Alcoholics Anonymous and how the most impacting aspect of it was the fact that a majority of the support group was constituted by young girls and boys.

Studies have shown that teenagers who begin drinking before the age of 16 are four times more likely to become alcoholics as adults.

Sadly, drinking at such an early age has become common among teenagers. Binge drinking before and after social events is a common practice among teens, seen by many people as a way for teenagers to avoid the awkwardness of maturing and a way for them to feel comfortable in new social situations.

grams, and policies, must create a feeling of tolerance and acceptance, opportunities for positive relationships, and knowledge of drug-related issues in order to protect against addiction.

On Thursday, May 7 Newton South students had the opportunity to attend workshops and seminars provided by the FCD in the auditorium.

The speakers present were both former addicts, both having been addicted to alcohol as well as other drugs such as marijuana and cocaine.

One, a former Newton North student, told of his experience with alcohol and recreational drugs during high school and of the escalation of his use once he entered college. The other, a Vietnam veteran, told of his use of alcohol to cope with social maturation as well as fear while serving in the army.

The latter of the two also discussed his career as a cop after returning from the war and its association with his addiction, as fellow cops allowed him to go unpunished after drinking and driving and getting caught with illegal substances.

After discussing personal experiences, both mentors went on to discuss their concern for teenagers who are beginning more and more to show early signs of addiction.

The first speaker shared his experience in Alcoholics Anonymous and how the most impacting aspect of it was the fact that a majority of the support group was constituted by young girls and boys.

Studies have shown that teenagers who begin drinking before the age of 16 are four times more likely to become alcoholics as adults.

Sadly, drinking at such an early age has become common among teenagers. Binge drinking before and after social events is a common practice among teens, seen by many people as a way for teenagers to avoid the awkwardness of maturing and a way for them to feel comfortable in new social situations.

Parents and administrators associated with Newton South are becoming more and more worried about the use of drugs and alcohol among teenagers at South and throughout Newton.

Donna Gordon, Cutler Housemaster, has been working hard to organize programs and events at South to inform students about the effects of their decisions.

South administrators are hoping to create the sort of “good community that the FCD speakers discussed in their presentations.

Read more

Like it? Share it!

Print

Copyright © Denebola | The Official School Newspaper of Newton South High School | 140 Brandeis Road, Newton, MA 02459.
Site designed by Chenzhe Cao.