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Denebola » Article » Opposing Viewpoint: Saved by the bell
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Opposing Viewpoint: Saved by the bell

By Denebola
Published: March 2008

By Wenqi Feng

Early dismissal or late arrival? This, along with everything else that involves missing school, is a much debated topic among students and faculty, even though there are only a few half-days every year.
Teachers and parents advocate late arrival because it supposedly gives three hours of much needed sleep to exhausted students and simultaneously prevents the public mayhem that would undoubtedly ensue from releasing students early in the afternoon.
What these adults do not realize is that students would just use these three extra morning hours as an excuse to stay up three hours later the night before. Besides, who says we can only sleep in the morning? I have enjoyed some of my greatest naps in the afternoon.


It is also quite unfounded to suggest that Newton South students are capable of any great disruption in these extra afternoon hours. This implication shows once again the school administration’s distrust of students (seen once already in the hidden-camera-incident). But the fact remains that whatever trouble can be caused between noon and 2:30 can just as easily happen after then.
There is no greater feeling than knowing there are 12 hours of sweet freedom ahead away from school and all the stress that comes along with it. As teenagers, nothing gives us more joy than missing school, or, if that’s not possible, the illusion of missing school.
Time seems to pass faster in the morning than in the afternoon because most of us aren’t fully awake at 7:40. After all, listening to our history teachers rant on about the Constitution is much more painful when we’re wide awake.
Consequently, early releases result in smoother days because we can’t fully remember how bored we were. Though we would be happy to have more time to snooze, we would be even happier to have more Facebook time or a few more hours to watch “American Idol.
Finally, the most important point of this tirade is that kids should be able to take a break to sit around and watch TV every once in a while.
Along with the bonus of skipping the unpleasant “bagged meal from the school cafeteria, getting out early excuses us from after-school activities. This results in more time to sit in front of the TV, slowly melting our brains. A whole afternoon for that? Well, that’s priceless.
Getting out of school early is one of those inexplicable joys of childhood (or in our case, adolescence) which only stressed-out, overworked, undernourished students can fully appreciate.
So, if you’ve lost track of what we’re talking about because you’ve already started daydreaming about the next half-day, I’ll reiterate: early releases are vastly superior to late arrivals.
Why the majority of the student body prefers getting released early to coming in late is hard to explain to adults, but to any 16-year-old, they’re obvious. (Did I mention we don’t have to eat school lunch?) 

Link To Other Opposing Viewpoint: Hit snooze on early release

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